Established in 1954, the Unified Department of Surgery today has over 130 surgeons based in Saskatoon, Regina and Prince Albert supported by 60 residents and fellows in our postgraduate training programs.

The Department of Surgery philosophy is based in the highest sense of ethical integrity, humanistic values and professional standards. Our faculty is committed to promoting excellence in all surgical specialty areas and to the highly personalized treatment of patients and their diseases. The vision for the Department of Surgery is to grow and establish its position as the premier center for best patient care based in service excellence, research and innovation. A fundamental responsibility of our faculty is to train the next generation of surgeons and researchers, along with supporting innovation at all levels of the surgical sciences.

Our commitment is to provide world-class care to the citizens of Saskatchewan by creating an educational environment of innovation and collaborative research. We strive to be one of the leading surgical departments worldwide.

About Us

It is a great honor and privilege for me to assume the responsibility as Fred H. Wigmore Professor and Unified Head of the Department of Surgery at the University of Saskatchewan and Saskatoon Health Region in a time when Saskatchewan is undergoing a transformational change. Saskatchewan is considered to have the strongest provincial economy in Canada with record low unemployment, and population growth higher than that of any other province. The two major cities in the Province, Saskatoon and Regina, are the fastest growing cities in Canada.

The University, Health Regions and Provincial Government are committed to deliver the best surgical care to the population of Saskatchewan. Major investments, such as the Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative, are well underway to achieve its target of access to surgery by all citizens of the Province within three months.  The new 300 million dollar Health Sciences building, the largest capital project in the history of the University, is a clear proof of this commitment. It is in this promising environment of unprecedented growth that the Department will face, with confidence, the challenges of today and the future.

My vision for the Department of Surgery is to grow and establish its position as a premier center for world-class patient care, excellence in research, innovation and surgical education. Our goal is nothing short of becoming one of the leading surgical departments worldwide.

Sincerely,

Ivar Mendez, MD, PhD, FRCSC, FACS, DSc (hon), FCAHS
Fred H. Wigmore Professor of Surgery

Mission

To provide world-class care to the citizens of Saskatchewan and beyond, train the surgeons of the future and foster innovation and collaborative research.

Vision

To establish the Department of Surgery as a premier center for world-class patient care, excellence in research, innovation and surgical education. Our goal is nothing short than of becoming one of the leading surgical departments worldwide

Core Values

As a member of the Department of Surgery of the University of Saskatchewan and the Saskatoon Health Region, it is expected that each member will:

  • Maintain the highest standards of personal, professional and academic honesty and integrity.
  • Respect privacy and confidentiality.
  • Communicate truthfully and compassionately with patients, families, learners, colleagues and staff. 
  • Treat patients and their families with respect and dignity.
  • Conduct professionally in demeanor, language and appearance in the professional health care setting.
  • Contribute to an atmosphere conductive to learning, professional and scholarly activity.
  • Assure that interactions with learners are always respectful and considerate.
  • Conduct research in an ethical and unbiased manner, report results truthfully, and credit ideas developed and work done by others.
  • Not discriminate on the grounds of age, race, color, ancestry, place of origin, political belief, religion, physical or mental disability, gender, marital or family status.
  • Respect personal boundaries of others, including but not limited to, refraining from making unwanted romantic or sexual overtures, protecting personal information, and respecting individual workspace.
  • Be accountable for personal decisions.
  • Adopt strategies to deal with errors or misjudgments.
  • Declare any actual or potential conflict of interest.
  • Participate in the collegial activities of the Department of Surgery.
  • Participate in established processes of professional self-regulation.

The Department of Surgery is committed to creating an environment that provides outstanding patient care and scholarly activity.

It is recognized that members of the Department have ethical obligations and a commitment to maintain the highest levels of professionalism in all interactions with patients, peers, learners, and staff within other disciplines and the community at large. Respect for every person is the core value central to all encounters.

The following "Code of Conduct" strives to define and provide guidance on relevant professional standards applicable to all members of the Department of Surgery. The professional standards articulated here demonstrate our recognition of the special professional privileges granted by society which in turn expects us to reflect in work and deed our commitment to their welfare. Consistent with this, our conduct as professionals should be characterized by the highest sense of ethical integrity and humanistic values.

All members of the Department of Surgery should be familiar with and adhere to existing policies of the University of Saskatchewan and the Saskatoon Health Region relating to professional and academic behavior.

Adherence to the Department of Surgery "Code of Conduct" is a condition of membership in the Department of Surgery.

The Code of Conduct may be revised periodically, and it is the obligation of members to be informed of and adhere to such changes.

As a member of the Department of Surgery of the University of Saskatchewan and the Saskatoon Health Region, it is expected that each member will:

  • Maintain the highest standards of personal, professional and academic honesty and integrity.
  • Respect privacy and confidentiality.
  • Communicate truthfully and compassionately with patients, families, learners, colleagues and staff. 
  • Treat patients and their families with respect and dignity.
  • Conduct professionally in demeanor, language and appearance in the professional health care setting.
  • Contribute to an atmosphere conductive to learning, professional and scholarly activity.
  • Assure that interactions with learners are always respectful and considerate.
  • Conduct research in an ethical and unbiased manner, report results truthfully, and credit ideas developed and work done by others.
  • Not discriminate on the grounds of age, race, color, ancestry, place of origin, political belief, religion, physical or mental disability, gender, marital or family status.
  • Respect personal boundaries of others, including but not limited to, refraining from making unwanted romantic or sexual overtures, protecting personal information, and respecting individual workspace.
  • Be accountable for personal decisions.
  • Adopt strategies to deal with errors or misjudgments.
  • Declare any actual or potential conflict of interest.
  • Participate in the collegial activities of the Department of Surgery.
  • Participate in established processes of professional self-regulation.

Click here to download a PDF of the Code of Conduct

Dr. Frederick Henry Wigmore Senior was born in Prince Edward Island on November 06, 1907. He received his BA in English from Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick and M.D. at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. He then continued with surgical residency at Toronto General Hospital. Originally Dr. Wigmore studied theology, but made the switch to medicine upon the advice of Dr. Charlie Gass at Mount Allison. (He later recruited Charlie's son, Dr. Dave Gass, to the Moose Jaw Clinic.)

Fred and Beth were married in 1939 and moved to Moose Jaw where Fred began working at the Moose Jaw Clinic until his 65th birthday in 1972. He started his own private practice and retired in 1985 at age 78. Fred and Beth were the parents of Barrie, Barbara, Marjorie, Connie and Fred. 

Moose Jaw was one of the best medical centres in Western Canada when Dr. Wigmore joined the staff. This continued for 30 more years as a result of Dr. Heal recruiting Dr. Wigmore and Dr. Don Moore. All three were chief residents at the University of Toronto together - a great coup by Dr. Heal. In those days, doctors often wrote off medical bills for families they knew were too poor to pay. Dr. Wigmore was here when the battle over Medicare erupted. He was one of the many doctors who at first opposed government control.

Dr. Wigmore had an impressive career in the medical profession. His reputation became known throughout Western Canada and the United States. He became Chief of Surgery in 1946, a position he held for almost 30 years. This was a volunteer position that took a great deal of time for a man already working long hours. At one time he carried half of the surgery in the City. In addition he served as President of the College of Physicians & Surgeons.

He carried memberships in the American College of Surgeons & Physicians and the Canadian Association of Clinical Surgeons. He served as area medical officer for the C.P.R. and was active in the Saskatchewan Medical Association. He also served as a surgeon in the army overseas for four years. It is obvious his medical profession impressed his children as daughter Marjorie became a nurse and son Fred is a doctor in Moose Jaw.

Dr. Wigmore was also a community minded man. He was instrumental in building additions to the Union Hospital. As acknowledgement of his many contributions to the building of the Moose Jaw Civic Centre he was declared Citizen of the Year in 1959, the year the Civic Centre opened. He then went on to serve as its President until the City took over direct control about ten years later.

Dr. Wigmore's contributions to the Chamber of Commerce were immense. He held office in the local Chamber as well as eight years in the Provincial and six years in the National Chamber of Commerce. He was a founding member of the Saskatchewan Cancer Commission, a Worshipful Master in the Masonic Order, and an active member of St. Andrews Church and the Crescent Park Foundation.

In his rare spare time, Dr. Wigmore enjoyed photography, hunting, fishing, and relaxing at his cottage at Buffalo Pound Lake. The Wigmores had many social ties and enjoyed years of coffee and curling parties, when close to 100 people gathered at their home. 

This amazing individual lived until the age of 91, a leader among men, who was dedicated to his family, his patients and his community.

In honour of his father, Dr. Barry Wigmore and his wife, Deedee, have funded the Fred H. Wigmore professorship in Surgery in the College of Medicine.

Surgical Divisions

Undergrad Education

Our undergraduate program in surgery is designed to be fun, interesting, challenging and to prepare you with the professional attitudes and skills which will stand you in good stead throughout your careers - no matter what area of medicine you will eventually practice in. In addition, we hope we will be able to stimulate a good number of you to consider surgery as your career life choice.

Our program is structured around two principal parts of the undergraduate curriculum - the Clinical Skills Program and the Clinical Clerkship. Surgery's involvement in the integrated Clinical Skills Course will take place in terms II, III & IV.


Undergraduate Education Committee members:

Dr. T. Domes, Chair, Undergraduate Education Committee, Division of Urology
Dr. I. Mendez, Head, Department of Surgery
Dr. A. Daters, Resident Representative, Division of General Surgery
Dr. S. Bharadwaj, Division of Thoracic Surgery
Dr. B. Clapson, Division of Plastic Surgery
Dr. G. Chandran, Division of Plastic Surgery
Dr. F. Christian, Division of General Surgery
Dr. B. DuVal, Division of Vascular Surgery
Dr. A. Dzus, Division of Orthopedic Surgery
Dr. R. Jaggi, Division of Otolaryngology
Dr. S. Mueller, St. Paul's Hospital Site Clerkship Director, Division of General Surgery
Dr. K. Milbrandt, Division of Pediatric Surgery
Dr. R. O'Carroll, Prince Albert Site Clerckship Director, Division of General Surgery
Dr. M. Ogaick, RUH Site Clerkship Director, Division of General Surgery
Dr. L. Peeling, Division of Neurosurgery
Dr. S. Pooler, Division of General Surgery (Regina)
Dr. P. Spafford, Division of Otolaryngology
Dr. M. Speiss, Division of Orthopedic Surgery

  • Clinical Skills II
    • Otolaryngology Skills Day
    • Vascular / Thoracic Skills Day
    • General Surgery Skills Day (includes Acute Abdomin Session)
    • Suturing (Leona Boyer)
    • Gowning & Gloving (Shirely Dueck)
  • Clinical Skills III
    • Orthopedic Surgery
    • Opthamology
    • Urology
  • Clinical Skills IV
    • Plastic Surgery

The program will prepare you for your Clinical Clerkship.

Click to view the Department of Surgery Professional Skills II Student Manual (Saskatoon / Regina).

During your Clinical Clerkship (JURSI) 501.8 program, you will be assigned to a General Surgey unit for 6 weeks. You will also be able to spend a further 2 weeks in a surgical specialty of your choice - including General Surgery, Vascular Surgery, Pediatric Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Urology, Neurosurgery, Orthopedic Surgery, ENT Surgery and Cardiovascular Surgery. Some students may spend part or all of their clinical clerkship in Regina or Prince Albert.

On the USASK web-site, there is also a clincial clerkship "group" that you will find when you log on to the PAWS and then navigate to groups | Surgical Clerkship Program.

Later (or earlier, depending on your rotation) you will spend 2 weeks in Anesthesiology.

The clinical clerkship can be a hectic time of ceaseless activity and it is important to organize your time so that you derive the maximum benefit from your rotation.

The daily morning round in surgery is often done much earlier than other specialties and at first you may find the pace of the round a little overwhelming. Residents are trying their best to be "on top" of the problems on the ward and usually there is another activity such as a clinic or operating room that starts at 8 am. Residents will be willing teachers, mentors and friends during the morning round and throughout your JURSI experience, but remember that even if there is no formal teaching possible during some morning rounds, you are still learning all the time from being thrust into the "deep end" of things on a surgical floor. Arranging and interpreting appropriate investigations, writing pain orders, managing surgical drains and stomas, fluid balance, talking to patients and relatives and interacting harmoniously with the nursing staff are only some of the skills you will learn during the time you spend on the wards. At all times, do not hesitate to ask questions and do not ever feel intimidated from clearing your doubts before taking a clinical decision.

There is usually more time at the surgical clinic for teaching and interacting with patients. Your presence at the surgical clinic is an important part of your education and you will be expected to get a sufficient number of clinic days experience.

In the operating room, you will have a chance to observe "living pathology." Surgery is unique among the specialties in this respect. You can not only come to a good working diagnosis with a good history, physician examination and investigations, you can also then observe the disease at first hand in a particular patient. You will also be an integral part of the operating team and this is an essential part of your training, no matter which specialty you finally choose.

When you are on call, you will have residents on call with you. You will often be the first to encounter the patient, take a history, carry out a physical examination, examine the investigations and arrive at a working diagnosis. Sometimes, many emergency calls will arrive almost at once from various sources - the wards, the ER, the OR etc. Do not hesitate to ask for help - residents will be very willing to help and you will learn much from interaction with them.

Surgery Syllabus

JURSI Manual


Surgery Rotation in Phase D

Objectives

By the end of the rotation, students will be expected to:

  1. Demonstrate competency (perform an appropriate history and physical examination, synthesize data to arrive at a differential diagnosis, use relevant diagnostic tests, participate in patient care) in the management and treatment of patients with the following conditions (Expert, Communicator):Recognize and describe the clinical findings in a patient that result in a differential diagnosis for a thyroid mass and provide an initial treatment/management plan (Expert, Communicator)

    1. Biliary tract disease
    2. Breast disease
    3. Cancer of the GI tract or breast
    4. Acute abdominal pain
    5. Traumatic injury
    6. Bowel obstruction
    7. GI hemorrhage
    8. Hernia
    9. Fluid and electrolyte abnormalities
    10. Shock
    11. Infectious post-operative complications
    12. Non-infectious post-operative complications
  2. Present a surgical research topic   (Expert, Communicator, Scholar)

  3. Identify the elements of informed consent (Expert, Communicator)

  4. Maintain clear, accurate, and appropriate records of clinical encounters  (Expert, Communicator)

  5. Communicate in a language easily understood by patients and family members (Communicator)

  6. Demonstrate an awareness of cultural and socio-economic issues that impact patient and population health(Expert, Communicator, Professional)

  7. Demonstrate an understanding of and practice evidence-based medicine  (Expert, Scholar, Communicator)

  8. Identify and appropriately use resources to improve knowledge base (Scholar)

  9. Demonstrate insight into one’s own limitations and methods to improve  (Professional, Scholar)

  10. Demonstrate application of ethical principles in the clinical decision-making process, including patient confidentiality, privacy and autonomy (Expert, Communicator, Professional)

  11. Participate with a team of allied health professionals, respecting individual roles, in the care and treatment of a patient (Collaborator, Communicator)

  12. Demonstrate appropriate professionalism skills including respect for patients and health team personnel, honesty, integrity, altruism, appropriate boundaries, responsibility, timeliness, and striving for personal balance (Professional)

  13. Practice the art of comforting patients and alleviating suffering (Communicator, Professional)

  14. Promptly identify emergency situations and respond appropriately (Expert)

 

ED-2s

Patient Categories

  1. Evaluate (focused history and targeted physical exam) new patients with surgically orientated problems in the inpatient/outpatient setting

  2. Evaluate (focused history and targeted physical exam) review patients with surgically orientated problems in the inpatient/outpatient setting

  3. Evaluate and manage postoperative fluid and electrolyte needs in the inpatient setting

  4. Evaluate and manage postoperative pain the inpatient setting

  5. Evaluate patients for infectious postoperative complications in the inpatient/outpatient setting

  6. Evaluate patients for non-infectious postoperative complications in the inpatient/outpatient setting

  7. Manage a patient’s postoperative wound in the inpatient/outpatient setting

 

Procedures/Skills

  1. Give an oral presentation of a patient problem-oriented surgical research topic to attending faculty and other members of the patient care team

  2. Observe the process of informed consent

  3. Perform as a first or second assistant to operating surgeons

  4. Scrub, gown and glove to assist operating surgeons

  5. Write brief operative reports in the health record

  6. Write postoperative orders in the health record

  7. Write daily progress notes in the health record documenting an inpatient’s hospital course

The Department of Surgery of the University of Saskatchewan encourages and welcomes students from other Canadian universities to do their electives in Saskatoon.  Elective students will find enthusiastic staff committed to teaching, a conducive atmosphere for learning and a launch-pad for your career aspirations in surgery.

Saskatoon is a fun, friendly city and is well connected to all major Canadian airports.

For all inquiries about electives at the University of Saskatchewan Department of Surgery, please contact:

 
Janine Corbett
Electives Coordinator
College of Medicine, 2nd Floor, A Wing - Rm 2.8.01
St.Paul's Teaching Office, Saskatoon
1702 20th West
S7M 0Z9
Tel: 306- 655- 5004    Fax: 306- 655 - 5794
 
For information on Saskatoon please follow the link: 

The University of Saskatchewan Student Surgical Society is a surgery-based interest group within the College of Medicine open to all students.  The society seeks primarily to increase interest in all of the surgical specialities.

Throughout the year the Society will host a variety of events and skills nights to provide networking opportunities for students, residents, and surgeons.  We are continuously grateful for all the surgeons and residents from both Regina and Saskatoon who participate in our events. The Society makes a strong effort to host events and talks in both study sites, Regina and Saskatoon.

Yearly Events for the Students Surgical Society:

Fall – Meet & Greet
Surgeons of all specialties and medical students are invited to get together at the Faculty Club for a night of socializing, appetizers, and drinks

March – Surgical Skills Night
Surgical attendings and residents of varying specialties take time to teach medical students the basics of suturing with the use of the ever-classic pig feet!

The Student Surgucal Society also hosts a “Women in Surgery” talk to give insight to female (and male) medical students about the challenges/triumphs of being a woman in surgery.


Student Surgical Society Executive

  • President - Kelsey Sharanowski (Class of 2017)
  • Vice-President - Taylor Oliver (Class of 2017)
  • Jr. President - Melody Wong (Class of 2018)
  • Jr. Vice-President - Lexis Gordon (Class of 2018)
  • Treasurer - Dustin Post (Class of 2017)
  • Secretary - Saskatoon - Brittany Pirlot (Class of 2017)
  • Secretary - Regina - Alek Szmigielski (Class of 2017)
  • Year 1 Representative - Yasaman Torabi (Class of 2018)
  • Year 2 Representative - Joel Howlett (Class of 2017)

Email: uofs.sss@gmail.com

Alternative Contact:  kds910@mail.usask.ca  (Current President - Kelsey Sharanowski)

Dr. Hugh MacLean Silver Medal and Prize

The Dr. Hugh MacLean Silver Medal and Prize in Surgery is awarded annually to the final year student who shows the highest proficiency in surgery.  Named for Dr. Hugh MacLean of Regina, and donated by his colleague, Dr. J.B. Ritchie, Regina.

Value is $100 and Silver Medal.  No application required.  Award to be given yearly upon graduation.

Born in Glasgow (Scotland) on July 30, 1878, MacLean emigrated with his family to Ontario in 1887 and graduated in medicine at the University of Toronto in 1906. He practiced in Lang, Saskatchewan, then trained in surgery in Chicago and New York in 1912–13 before returning to Regina. He was unsuccessful in the Regina federal constituency for the Progressives in 1921 and for the CCF in 1935. He retired to California because of ill health in 1938, but remained an “eminence grise” to the CCF party. His speech on “Medical Health Service” to the CCF provincial convention in Regina on July 13, 1944, was a precursor to the Sigerist report; MacLean supported Sigerist’s appointment. He was later described by T.C. Douglas as the “spiritual godfather” of both the University of Saskatchewan Medical School and the University Hospital. MacLean died in La Jolla, California on January 1, 1958.


Isabelle & Emmett Hall Scholarship

The Isabelle & Emmett Hall Scholarship is Awarded annually to a student entering the final medical year (J.U.R.S.I. or clinical clerkship). The five students with the highest marks on the musculoskeletal section of the final systems examination will be invited to prepare a 1,500 to 2,000 word essay on a problem related to Orthopaedic Surgery. The student producing the best essay will be awarded the scholarship.  Award was donated by Isabel and Emmett Hall. 

 Value is $2,000.  No application required. Award to be given yearly upon graduation.

Emmett Hall was a former Chief Justice of the Queen's Bench Court for Saskatchewan and member of the Supreme Court of Canada; and Chairman of the Royal Commission on Health Services which led to the establishment of the national medicare system.  He served as the Chancellor of the University of Saskatchewan from 1980 to 1986.


Professor’s Prize in Surgery

The Professor’s Prize in Surgery is earmarked for the student in the graduating class that shows the greatest promise as a future clinical surgeon.  Award is for recipient book purchase at the University of Saskatchewan Bookstore.

Value is book prize. No application required.  Award to be given yearly based on reviews from Undergrad Office.


Dash & Reed Research Award

Terms of Reference:

  • Award to be distributed through the Department of Surgery
  • Research to be presented at the Department of Surgery Research Day
  • Award to be given based on Research Day judges, Student Preceptor and representative of Dr. Dash and /or Dr. Reed
  • Award of $2000 annually to be presented at the banquet for Department of Surgery Research Day
  • Award eligibility based on research that has been presented at a local, regional, national or international level and/or accepted for publication in a peer reviewed journal
  • Student recipient should be nominated by their preceptors based on the following criteria:
    • demonstrates a recognition that clinical research requires personal sacrifice and time commitment
    • ability to see a project through to completion
    • demonstrate the learned basic fundamentals of clinical research including:
      • writing a proposal
      • structured literature review performed by student, not a librarian
      • active participation seeing the proposal through the Research and Ethics Board process
      • execution of the project in a timely fashion
      • timely data analysis and manuscript/presentation preparation
      • timely submission for publication and/or presentation



Dr. Trustin Domes

Director of Undergraduate Education


Marilyn Baniak

Undergraduate Education Coordinator (Clerkship)


Renee Ryan

Undergraduate Education Coordinator (Pre-Clerkship)

  • 306-966-5668

Postgraduate Education

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada Postgraduate (Residency) training programs are offered in General Surgery, Neurosurgery, and Orthopedic Surgery.

Dr. William Dust
Director of Education
Tel: (306) 844-1110
Fax: (306) 655-0638
surgery.dept@usask.ca

Surgical Foundations
Dr. K. Kvinlaug
Program Director

Surgical Foundation
Committee Meeting Terms of Reference

Division of General Surgery
Dr. P. Hayes 
Program Director 
  Dr. G. Kaban 
Co-Director, Regina
Dr. C. Kenyon 
Co-Director, RUH Site

Division of Neurosurgery
Dr. M. Kelly
Program Director
Phone: (306) 844-1104
Fax: (306) 655-0639

Division of Orthopedic Surgery
Dr. A. King
Program Director
Phone: (306) 844-1109
Fax: (306) 655-0638
Ms. Karen Bader
Program Administrative Assistant
Tel: (306) 844-1091
Fax: (306) 844-1522
karen.bader@usask.ca
Carissa Kenaschuk
Program Administrative Assistant
Tel:: (306) 966-8201
Fax: (306) 966-8026
neuro.surgery@usask.ca
Ms. Judy Classen
Program Administrative Assistant
Tel: (306) 844-1114
Fax: (306) 655-0638
ortho.surgery@usask.ca

Mandatory Courses

ATLS (Advanced Trauma Life Support)

Dr Paul Hayes, Provincial Chairman
Frankie Affleck, Administrative Coordinator (saskatoonATLS@hughes.net)

Residents are registered for this mandatory course in their first or second year of training.  This course is mandatory for all residents

CLR 800.3 Clinical Research Methodologies Course

Course Coordinator: Dr Vivian Ramsden
Contact: kim.sanderson@usask.ca
Telephone: 306-655-4213

Residents are registered for this mandatory 13 week online course in their first year of training. This course is mandatory for all residents and will prepare them for future independent research.

Critical Appraisal Course

Contact: Ms. Carma-Lynn Ahenakew, Postgraduate Medical Education Office
Telephone: 306-966-1640
Email: carma.ahenakew@usask.ca

Goals of the course are:

  • To understand the principles of evidence-based health care and the main controversies surrounding its application in practice.
  • To develop skills in the critical appraisal of scientific literature in a manner that will influence your clinical practice.
  • To provide an introduction to the factors which should be taken into account when planning and conducting a research study.

Course format:

A full day workshop will be held from 9:00 am to 4:00 –m in the Health Sciences B450 and adjacent rooms (date TBA).  Two plenary sessions will review the principles of critical appraisal.  Small group discussions will permit in-depth exploration of selected journal articles. Residents of the same discipline will be placed in the same small group to be led, where possible, by a faculty tutor from the same discipline.  Residents are expected to read all required material prior to the Workshop.

Text:

Both of these books can be borrowed from the Health Science Library (on reserve) or can be purchased at the University Bookstore.  Choose either:

  1. Guyatt G, Rennie D (eds), Users’ Guides to the Medical Literature: Essentials of Evidence-Based Clinical Practice
  2. Guyatt G, Rennie D (eds), Users’ Guides to the Medical Literature: A Manual for Evidence-Based Clinical Practice

Evaluation

You will be given exercises at the end of the sessions which will be due the following week. Each of these will be worth 50% of the final mark. The final mark will be communicated to the Dean’s office and from there to your Program Director. We will recommend that the pass mark be 60%.

Surgical Foundations Seminar: Two Year Course 

The Surgical Foundations Seminar series begins in September and is held every second Tuesday from 4:30 to 5:30 pm.    The objective of this seminar is to acquire knowledge underlying the basic principles of surgery in general, and to prepare the resident to successfully pass the principles of surgery examination.

Surgical Skills Course

Contact: Dr. J. Shaw (844-1105)
This course teaches technical skills and is mandatory for all R1 residents. It takes place once a year.
The course includes Asepsis & instrument identification, Knot tying, suturing, surgical airway, chest tube insertion and central line insertion.

TIPS (Teaching Improvement Project System)

Coordinator: Sean Polreis (966-1311)

This course is offered and arranged through the College of Medicine.

  • In order to prepare the resident for their teaching role, it is mandatory that all residents take the TIPS course. This must be taken within the first two years of their training program.

For more information on Residency visit these departments:

General Surgery

Neurosurgery

Orthopaedic

Kloppenburg Resident Research Award

The Kloppenburg Resident Research Award is an annual award to a Postgraduate Clinical Education Student (Resident) in the field of Neurosurgery and / or Orthopaedic Surgery.  Award will be made to the Resident who is judged to have made the best research presentation at Resident’s Research Day. Selection of the award recipient will be made by the Visiting Professor with the Department Head and the Division Heads of Neurosurgery and Orthopaedic Surgery who participate in the activities relating to Residents’ Research Day.  The award was created in 1989 by donation from the law firm Kloppenburg & Kloppenburg to recognize medical-legal consultation the firm has received from our medical faculty.

No application required.  Award to be given yearly based on reviews from judge panel on Research Day.



D.C. MacRae Scholarship

The D.C. MacRae Scholarship – Postgraduate was established in 1965 by donation from the Estate of Dr. D.C. MacRae of Carlyle Saskatchewan to provide scholarships for postgraduate study in Surgery to worthy graduates of its College of Medicine, the recipients to be chosen by the Department of Surgery Research Committee, and the selection to be made on the basis of merit, character and natural ability and not necessarily or primarily on academic standing.  Faculty may in its discretion request repayment of all or part of the moneys advanced.  Other donors are encouraged to contribute to this award.

No application required.  Award to be given yearly based on reviews from judge panel on Research Day.



Samuel Claman Prize in Orthopedic Surgery

The Samuel Claman Prize in Orthopedic Surgery is awarded to a post-graduate student in Orthopaedic Surgery showing the most promise in Orthopaedics Surgery Research. The annual prize will be recommended by the Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and made at the conclusion of the academic year.

 

Continuing Medical Education

Members of the Department of Surgery participate extensively in continuing professional learning (CPL) programs through attendance at various educational conferences, and recognizing that many faculty are committed to educational programs of National, North American or International specialty societies, including the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada

Surgical Skills Lab


The Surgical Skills Laboratory (formerly Microsurgery Laboratory) is utilized by undergraduate and postgraduate trainees in the Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry. Basic surgical skills are taught to undergraduate dental students on an individual basis (Thursday afternoons) and to undergraduate medical students in year 2 (groups of two to three; Thursday mornings) and in year 3 (groups of two to five) at the start of each general surgical rotation. A suture refresher course is held in January during orientation for clinical clerks.


Postgraduate trainees in the Core Surgery Program develop microvascular skills during the Plastic Surgery rotation. The Surgical Skills Laboratory is also used for the Advanced Surgical Skills Course (directed by Dr. R. Kennedy).  Basic surgical skills are also taught to postgraduate trainees in the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Opthalmology Family Medicine, and Emergency Medicine.


The laboratory is also used for the Basic Surgical Skills Course, required by all researchers at the University of Saskatchewan. In previous years, the laboratory was used for small animal research, and still retains this capacity.


Contact:
Leona Boyer, RVT, Coordinator 
Room B410 Health Science Bldg
Phone: (306) 966-8212
Email: leona.boyer@usask.ca

Dr. Miller's Skills Lab Presentation

Surgical Humanities

THE HUMANITIES IN THE LIFE OF A SURGEON

The objectivist approach to medical education has been quite correctly credited with the major breakthroughs that have made all our lives unimaginably better than even a century ago. The scientific method has been the backbone of this progress and this breaking down of disease processes into verifiable, component parts is of course, a core part of the life-long education of the surgeon, beginning at medical school.

However, a coming together of the individual and societies, the subjective experience of disease by the patient and an education and engagement in the hopes, fears, doubts, joys and sorrows that are an integral part of the human condition, has not had anything like the same emphasis in medical education. This is partly because we do science so well.

But the experience of the two world wars taught us that science and its phenomenal triumphs, when divorced from the spiritual, moral, ethical and humanistic narrative works powerfully and tragically for the destruction of the very thing it was meant to preserve.

At its most basic level an education and engagement in the medical humanities makes us more fully human. The human narrative must inform a study of human disease. And without such an education and engagement, physicians will become well-trained scientific purveyors of pills, potions (and operations) without ministering to the whole individual with compassion, understanding and empathy.

The Surgical Humanities Program within the Department of Surgery seeks to educate and engage surgeons, residents and medical students in the humanities. Music, art, literature, philosophy, drama, languages and the history of surgery are all being recruited in this effort and avenues of active involvement and research in the surgical humanities are offered. It promises to be an exciting journey - please come, join us.

Francis Christian
Director, Surgical Humanities Program


About Dr. Christian


Dr. Francis Christian is a General Surgeon in the Department of Surgery, a poet and novelist. His first collection of poems was published in 2000 and his novel, “Why was she so dear?” is available for Kindle, through amazon.com.

Poetry and surgery are “like the right and left arms of my existence,” says Dr. Christian, and he has had a deep interest in the surgical humanities from the start of his career. His surgical education fellowship thesis was on the subject of developing a validated scoring system for an engagement in the medical humanities.

He is looking forward to developing the first Surgical Humanities Program in the country; to be a leader, a beacon, a “light upon the hill” for surgeons everywhere.

Read the Spring 2015 issue

Overview

The Journal of the Surgical Humanities, published semiannually online and in print, seeks to represent the best written, visual and musical work that will illuminate the relevance and importance of the humanities in the life of a physician and surgeon. Thus, it is neither a purely surgical journal, nor a purely humanities based journal. Those who wish to submit to the journal should not, however, be constrained by this description. As a general rule, if you are in doubt about your work’s possible significance to the journal, you are encouraged to submit.

Thus, we would be very interested in a surgeon/physician or nurse who seriously engages in writing poetry (regardless of whether it is medically related poetry); or in painting, music, sculpture, or other digitally reproducible art form, regardless of whether the particular work is referenced within a medical context.

Similarly, we encourage submissions from non-physicians and non-surgeons, including amateur and professional artists, musicians and writers as well as humanities scholars, whose work has a medical or surgical theme or suggestion, however slight.

Call for Submissions

Submissions to the Journal will be accepted in two categories:

  • Written Work: poetry, essays and historical vignettes.
  • Visual and Musical Work: submissions in digital reproductions, of paintings, photographs, music and sculpture.


All submissions should be sent by email to surgical.humanities@usask.ca

Surgical Humanities Editorial Board

Editor in Chief:  Francis Christian

Editorial Board:

  • Francis Christian
  • Ivar Mendez
  • Taras Mycyk
  • Justine Pearl
  • Marlessa Wesolowski
  • David Swann

Research

Welcome to the Department of Surgery Research!

Research is an essential element of surgery past present and future, a fact that is more relevant in today’s rapidly changing world than ever. The Department of Surgery is committed to the development of exciting cutting edge research programs by taking advantage of the natural strengths offered by the Saskatchewan context such as the Synchrotron, the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, the emerging provincial clinical quality improvement program, the Health Quality Council and a diverse group of University of Saskatchewan Basic Science researchers.

Please feel free to contact me at 306-655-2425 or our Department Chair, Dr. Ivar Mendez at 306-966-8641, if you have any questions about our research programs and how you might fit in — either as a medical student, graduate student, resident, faculty or collaborator.

Dr. Nael Shoman,
Director of Research and Graduate Studies
Department of Surgery, University of Saskatchewan

The Biostatistical Support (BS) is a new Biostatistics resource to clinical researchers at the Department of Surgery, University of Saskatchewan. The creation of Biostatistical resource raised the department to a new level effectiveness and relevance in clinical and health research. This support serving an important role in initiating interdisciplinary, collaborative research among divisions in the Department of Surgery.

Our Vision

The Biostatistical Support will provide the highest quality of services and will promote the highest standards in research.

Our Mission

Our mission is to conduct high quality innovative research, to provide research services and stimulate collaboration amongst investigators from all divisions. We will provide methodological support to clinical and biomedical researchers in a collaborative manner to assist researchers in making the best use of their resources in all phases of  clinical research.


To get support

Contact Information

Biostatistical Support - Department of Surgery:

Prosanta Mondal

Royal University Hospital, Room 2708
103 Hospital Drive
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan   S7N 0W8
Phone: (306) 844-1350

Contact

4th floor, Suite B419,
107 Wiggins Road, 
Saskatoon SK S7N 5E5

306-966-8641