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About Us

We learn, teach, work, and live on traditional Indigenous territories that in Canada include treaty lands, unceded lands, and Métis homelands. We pay our respects to First Nation, Métis, and Inuit ancestors.  The University of Saskatchewan is on the Homeland of the Métis and Treaty 6 territory.  In our commitment to this place we value respectful relationships with the people around us -past, present, and future – and the animals, lands, waters, and skies that nurture us all. We strive to live these values in our programs, activities, and interactions: relationships grounded in safety and humility, respect for all peoples and their world views, reciprocity in all relationships, relevance to wholistic wellness, and responsibility for informed pedagogy and practice.

The Department of Community Health and Epidemiology is a dynamic, cohesive academic department comprising 17 faculty, 26 medical faculty and 34 associate and adjuncts, located in the Academic Health Sciences Building. We have active graduate programs at the Masters and Doctoral levels, and make a vital contribution to the undergraduate education of medical and health sciences students and postgraduate education with the Public Health and Preventative Medicine Residency Program. Our teaching, research and community engagement focus on population health with a lens on social justice and equity for all.

Our department (CH&E) is concerned with understanding the individual and collective factors that determine health and applying this knowledge to maintain and improve the health status of population’s and reduce inequities in health status between groups.  The term ‘community’ reflects the historic emphasis of our field on the creation, protection, and promotion of health within the context of communities, which may be geographic or based on shared identity and social ties.

Welcome to the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology! It is a great place to learn, work and live. The Faculty’s diverse backgrounds and training combined with a wealth of experiences create excellent opportunities for academic development as well as ground-breaking and meaningful research.

 It is a place where each faculty, each staff, each student is also encouraged to show leadership and contribute to the collective.  Our teaching, research and social engagement focus on population health with a lens on social justice and equity for all.

Students, expect to be inspired by your studies, encouraged to think out of the box and to push yourself. You will be called to engage at the community level to make a difference and be nurtured by great change leaders.

It is also a place to have fun and to grow a deeper appreciation of diversity in a creative and safe environment. One of the best measures of success is the testimony of many of our graduates who currently occupy leadership positions in the health care system, in public health, in academia, in community and government.

- Dr. Anne Leis, Department Head

Our Vision
We envision a society in which all people have equitable opportunity to experience optimal health.

Our Mission
We create, synthesize and translate knowledge for evidence-informed policies and practices which support population health equity locally and globally.

Values
1. Respect
is defined as mutual acceptance and encouragement of people’s critical thinking and the diversity of persons, communities and cultures.
Behaviours which demonstrate respect

    • We address the needs and concerns of student, faculty and staff.
    • We use participative decision making.
    • We consult with and value the views of others
    • We encourage respectful collegial discussion and critical examination of diverse opinions.
    • We value other people’s perspectives, time and space.

2. Fairness involves exercising impartiality and equity in interpersonal relationships as well as balancing conflicting interests.
Behaviours which illustrate fairness

    • We consider the interests of all parties.
    • We treat others equitably with dignity.
    • We provide timely and constructive feed-back.
    • We support equitable relationships with partners.
    • We practice collaboration through regular communications and equitable distribution of powers among stakeholders.
    • We work within and follow ethical principles and guidelines.
    • As a department we provide fair access to learning and funding opportunities for all students.
    • As a department we provide fair access to departmental support and professional development opportunities for all faculty and staff.

 3. Excellence refers to the achievement of exceptionally high quality in academic standards, service to the community and innovation.
Behaviours which demonstrate excellence

    • We support perseverance in the pursuit of challenging goals
    • We are committed to be active participants in the excitement and enrichment of a learning community.
    • We support high achievement in students work habits and personal career’s goals.
    • We promote curiosity and critical thinking in teaching and research.
    • We vigorously pursue research for the benefit of persons and communities.
    • We model and mentor commitment to quality.
    • We foster new ideas and innovation in all we do.
    • We are open to constructive criticism through peer reviews and students evaluations

4. Professionalism refers to a commitment to abide by high ethical standards of behaviour and relevant group standards.  It requires an on-going personal commitment to integrity.
Behaviours which demonstrate Professionalism

    • We demonstrate inclusiveness in our day to day work.
    • We practice open communications and responsibility.
    • We know and apply ethical and professional standards of conduct.
    • We take responsibility for our actions.
    • We are actively engaged in research and activities which move knowledge to action.
    • We are prepared to take risks and learn from our mistakes.

Goals of the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology

Department as a Healthy Community

    1. To be a healthy and vibrant community providing a supportive working environment based on good communication and collaboration.
    2. To support faculty and staff professional development towards personal career goals.
    3. To integrate the goals of individual faculty and staff with Department priorities, responsibilities and funding.

Community Engagement and Social Accountability

    1. To develop relationships with community members, groups and agencies, with attention to issues of social justice.
    2. To share and mobilize the knowledge and skills of the department with diverse partners. This includes the provision of direct service to develop and maintain professional skills, and for remuneration.
    3. To continuously improve our outreach through on-going monitoring and feed-back.

Teaching and Learning

    1. To foster high-quality, scholarly teaching, based on an interdisciplinary evidence-informed Population Health approach.
    2. To prepare students to effectively perform the roles of practitioner, researcher, and/or educator. 
    3. To foster self-directed, life long and collaborative learning.
    4. To use evidence based methods to effectively self-evaluate and to assess courses and programs on a regular basis.

Research

    1. To conduct excellent, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research in population health with a focus on inequities locally and globally.
    2. To recruit and retain students and trainees who have succeeded in their preparatory fields, and mentor these students/trainees to become excellent researchers and research users.
    3. To develop diverse partnerships to co-create knowledge and find applications in society.
    4. To support one another, via formal and informal means, thereby creating and sustaining a vibrant research milieu that is one of the most successful in Canada for its size and resources.

Position Statements

The statements below are issued from time to time in response to events and circumstances in our community, country, and the world that are of immediate public interest and that fit within our vision, mission, and values (see About Us). We see these as living statements on the themes of health equity and justice that are updated as events warrant. Statements are listed from most recent to oldest.

The Following Position Statements are from the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology and the Reconciliation Committee.

Position Statement on False Claims to Indigenous Identity 

We have been enormously troubled about the recent public revelations surrounding the claims to Indigenous identity of a member of our department. The University of Saskatchewan has initiated an expedited investigation and we anticipate the release of the findings on this case in due course. In the meantime, we feel it is important to state our position on pretendianism in our spheres of teaching, research, and professional practice. We stand with Indigenous colleagues who have lead the way.

False claims to Indigenous identity are inextricable from the Indigenous-focused scholarship built on them. We cannot teach integrity to future generations of scholars and leaders if we do not also model this in our own work. We also cannot expect society to value the knowledge we produce if we cannot demonstrate it has been built on a foundation of integrity.

Over the past week we have heard the hurt, disappointment, and frustration in the words and voices of Indigenous scholars, students, and peoples. We are only beginning to grasp the magnitude of the impact false identity claims and equivocal institutional responses are having on Indigenous peoples, families, and Nations. They have most certainly eroded trust and set back relationships at a time when non-Indigenous peoples and institutions have been called to respond to truth and reconciliation. Pretendianism is a serious concern for which we are all accountable.

It is imperative that academic institutions and those that fund research with Indigenous peoples recognize and act on their accountabilities for identity claims, ensuring that Indigenous researchers, faculty, staff, students, and the Nations to which they belong, determine appropriate ways to do so. We are pleased to see that these efforts are underway with renewed momentum and urgency in recent days.

The department of Community Heath and Epidemiology is committed to truth and reconciliation, and as academics and health care professionals, to the core value of integrity. We rededicate ourselves to this core value and to the actions to which we have been called to build new and meaningful relationships with the Indigenous peoples of this land we share.  

This past week we have been deeply saddened to learn about the undocumented burial of 215 Indigenous children at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. This is devastating news that unequivocally confirms what former attendees, their families, and communities already knew and have been talking about for decades. This news has reopened raw wounds in all Indigenous communities across Canada. We mourn with them. There will be findings like this at other former residential school sites, as other Indigenous communities are undertaking similar investigations on the grounds of former schools in Canada. Reconciliation demands that we publicly recognize this genocide, which continues in the disproportionate harms to and deaths of Indigenous children in child welfare. We must be unrelenting in our advocacy for redress, for research that continues to lay bare these truths, and for ensuring that all those in our classrooms and in our lives never forget.

The 47 findings and 17 recommendations found within the final report of the Public Interest Investigation into the RCMP’s Investigation of the death of Colten Boushie and the events that followed reveals clear evidence of discrimination and insensitivity. Further, the appalling behaviour that has been directed at the Boushie family and Indigenous peoples, (in particular of the online community), has been fuelled by these systemic deficiencies. Sadly, this has continued unabated since Colten Boushie was shot and killed by Gerald Stanley in the summer of 2016.

At the same time, this past year of the pandemic has seen a surge in violence directed at Asian peoples, including right here in our own communities. We support President Peter Stoicheff’s recently released statement on anti-Asian racism. These events and responses are high profile markers of insidious, ongoing, and deeply entrenched xenophobia, discrimination, and white privilege that have no place in a healthy and just world. 

We condemn the hatred, violence, and oppression that continues systemically and in individual behaviours in Canada and elsewhere against Indigenous peoples, people of colour, of the Muslim faith, and diverse gender identities. Anti-oppressive and anti-racist pedagogy, research, and practice are central to our vision for an equitable society. We will continue to ensure that staff, students, and faculty are supported to advance this vision safely, humbly, and respectfully as a collective and in our individual actions.

Once again we are called to stand against our racist and discriminatory system and society that culminated on September 28th, 2020 in Joyce Echaquan’s tragic and horrific death under the eyes and abuse of those whose very professions are dedicated to care -with dignity- for human life. Joyce Echaquan was a 37-year-old Indigenous wife and mother of seven and a member of the Atikamekw Nation from Manawan. We are ashamed of what happened and feel that as a society we have failed her, her family and the wider community of Indigenous people. Unfortunately, this treatment is not unique to her nor to the province of Quebec.

This is a reminder that racism is pervasive and rampant in our healthcare system and our educational structures. This systemic racism is unacceptable and shameful, and it must stop. As the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology in a College of Medicine, we have a deep responsibility to shape health professionals under our training, now and in the future, to provide safe, humanizing, and compassionate health care, to remove systemic barriers to health careers encountered by Indigenous peoples, and to collectively advance health equity in policies and programs across all sectors and jurisdictions. We commit to doing better.

The Department of Community Health & Epidemiology stands in solidarity with those engaged in resistance to the persistent individual and systemic violence, police brutality, dispossession, and death inflicted on racialized peoples in Canada, the United States, and around the world. We mourn the unjust deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, Tamir Rice, and many more in the United States. Similarly, in Canada we mourn Colten Boushie, Jacob Sansom, Maurice Cardinal, Regis Korchinski-Paquet, Tina Fontaine and all the missing and murdered Indigenous women. The disproportionate burden of resistance is carried on these same racialized shoulders. As members of a Department whose mission it is to promote equity, we reaffirm our responsibility to call out injustice, and dismantle white privilege and settler colonialism. We also rededicate ourselves toward meaningful allyship in ways that do not manipulate, tokenize, usurp or silence racialized peoples, identities, and knowledge.

Reconciliation

“Let us find a way to belong to this time and place together. Our future, and the well-being of all our children, rests with the kinds of relationships we build today.”
— Elder Chief Dr. Robert Joseph, Reconciliation Canada Ambassador

The department of Community Health & Epidemiology’s (CH&E) reconciliation approach is built around the three pillars of academia: namely teaching and learning, research, and community engagement.  We have a reconciliation working group consisting of  students, staff and faculty committed to advancing the department’s responses to the Truth & Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action (C2A). 

  • The health education system at the University of Saskatchewan is committed to the recruitment, retention, and success of Indigenous students, staff, and faculty (TRC-Calls to Action #23). 
  • CH&E is committed to supporting Indigenous people to achieve a more equitable position in our community and society.
  • CH&E is committed to taking up and linking others to opportunities for anti-racist education
  • CH&E is committed to providing cultural safety/humility training to all members of our community (C2A #23) to increase understanding of Indigenous ways of knowing and doing
  • CH&E is committed to be lifelong learners. We always learn, from the web of relationships between humans, animals, plants, natural forces, spirits, and the forms of land in particular places, as opposed to the discovery of universal laws (Battiste &Henderson 2000, p. 448).[i]
  • CH&E is committed to blending Indigenous health and wellness content into our curriculum. This includes exposing the historical and ongoing traumas that affect Indigenous health (C2A #18), learning about the means to address these ill-health effects and promoting wellness (C2A #19), and education specific to the health professional training that we deliver (C2A #24).

[i] Battiste Marie, Henderson James Youngblood (Sa'ke'j). Protecting Indigenous Knowledge and Heritage. A Global Challenge. SERIES: Purich's Aboriginal Issues Series. UBC Press, 01 Apr 2000, Purich Publishing. ISBN:9781895830156

  • CH&E research is committed to strengthening our continuing relationships with Indigenous communities as active and respected partners in research. 
  • CH&E is committed to ethical principles for Indigenous health research as set out by the Tri-Council.  These include sharing in resources, giving back to the community, support for community capacity development, respect for Indigenous community governance and full self-determination, respect for indigenous ways of knowing and healing (C2A #21/22), and respect for the role of Elders and Knowledge Holders in research. 
  • CH&E is committed to including Indigenous communities and their people as actors at all levels of the university life, advising on Indigenous teaching, learning, research, and protocols. This is part of decentering and decolonizing the role of the academic system and collaborating in a more equitable engagement with the communities. [i]
  • CH&E is committed to reaching out sincerely and fully with external communities as partners in our development.
  • CH&E seeks to be a University presence in the community through volunteerism and engagement in community events – bridging the gap between university and community (I.e., November 25, 2020 marked the 30th anniversary of Neil Stonechild’s passing; the White Buffalo Youth Lodge hosted a vigil – how can the university community engage in community events such as this?)

[i] Gaudry & Lorenz. Indigenization as inclusion, reconciliation, and decolonization: navigating the different visions for indigenizing the Canadian Academy. AlterNative 2018. Vol 14(3): 281-227)

Learning a language is a wonderful and effective way to appreciate the different nuances of another culture and to communicate with its people. 

Why not learn a language of one of the Indigenous peoples on whose lands we live?!

  1. The University of Saskatchewan offers two Cree courses starting this fall, Cree 110 and Cree 210 (regular tuition rates apply).
  2. The College of Arts & Science also offers, for anybody, among its many non-credit language programs a 10-wk course in Cree 1, on either Tuesdays or Wednesdays (either 10am-12pm or 4-6pm), starting April 13 (or 14) until June 22 (or 23). Ms. Inez Weenie is a passionate teacher of Cree!

If you prefer learning Cree in conversational ways and for free, there are currently two possibilities:

  1. Tuesday evenings, for beginners and intermediates: join the Cree Group on Facebook, or get the zoom link by emailing Bill Cook at <creeinstructor@gmail.com>. 
  2.  Thursday evenings, at 6:30pm: Randy Morin, who has organized many Cree language revitalization events, offers Cree classes for the next ten Thursdays. Inquire at <iamboyce@hotmail.com>.

 

Alumni

60th Anniversary and Reunion

The Department of Community Health & Epidemiology hosted its 60th Anniversary and Reunion from October 24–26, 2019 in Saskatoon. 

More than 100 people attended the celebration, which included alumni from the community and population health sciences graduate programs and the Public Health and Preventive Medicine residency training. The event activities included a seminar, reception, conference and banquet, campus tours and lunch at the Remai Modern.

 
Let the playlist continue to see more videos from our alumni. Or view them on YouTube.

Undergraduate Program

The faculty members of the department are closely involved in introducing concepts of population and community health to undergraduate medical students through courses/learning formats such as Medicine & Society, Clinical Integration, Community Service Learning, Certificate in Global Health, among others.

Some faculty participate in committees such as the curriculum committee, program evaluation committee, medical education oversight committee, that are responsible for the design, implementation and evaluation of the undergraduate medical curriculum.

Graduate Programs

Graduate Handbook Student Supervisor Agreement

The Department offers MSc and PhD programs in Community and Population Health Sciences. The College of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (CGPS) sets the minimum entrance requirements for graduate programs and for English proficiency

Students will be admitted to the CGPS only upon the recommendation of CH&E.  Meeting minimum entry requirements DOES NOT guarantee acceptance. Recommendations by CH&E are based on the evaluation of academic ability, alignment of research interests with CH&E faculty, and availability of an appropriate thesis supervisor.

CH&E graduate students are required to be in residence until core program requirements have been met, including thesis committee approval of pre-proposal, completion of required courses, and completion of the comprehensive exam (PhD students).

Funding
A conservative estimate of the cost of one year of graduate studies at the University of Saskatchewan (including tuition, accommodation, other living/study expenses) is $22,000 CDN. The department DOES NOT guarantee student funding. A limited amount of money is available to support students and is allocated on a competitive basis according to students’ academic record. 

To be eligible for CH&E scholarship funding, students must have obtained at least 80% in the last two years of undergraduate or graduate study. Other funding may be available through faculty members’ research grants. All students are encouraged to apply for scholarships from local and national sources.

The MSc program in Community and Population Health Sciences prepares students for academic careers, including pursuit of doctoral studies, or to work in a variety of research-intensive environments. Students will learn about community and population health concepts, epidemiology, theory, and research; develop basic skills in qualitative and quantitative research methods and project management; and gain hands-on experience in research through the completion of a thesis.

The MSc in Community and Population Health Sciences is a thesis-based program that can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Program Overview
Curriculum
Five core courses (15 credit units), one elective course (3 credit units), and non-credit courses: CHEP 994 Thesis, CHEP 990 Department Seminar and on-line courses, GPS 960 Introduction to Ethics and Integrity and GPS 961 Ethics in Human Research.

Courses
Required  Credit Courses (course descriptions search)
CHEP 800.3 – Epidemiology 1
CHEP 802.3 - Community and Population Health Research Methods
CHEP 811.3 - Professional Research Skills in Community and Population Health
CHEP 813.3 - Embodied Inequities Social and Structural Determinants of Population Health
plus one research methods class:
CHEP 805.3  – Biostatistics 1 
or
A qualitative research methods course
(PSY 809.3, JSGS 851.3, ERES 845, NURS 893 or equivalent).

Required Non-Credit Courses

CHEP 994 – Research Thesis
CHEP 990 – Departmental Seminar: All students are required to register in and attend the departmental seminar series. One core requirement of this seminar is presentation of thesis work at the annual “CH&E Student Research Day”. Completion of the seminar requirement occurs when the student’s thesis is successfully defended.
GPS 960 – Introduction to Ethics and Integrity (on-line): This course discusses ethical issues that graduate students may face during their time at the U of S.
GPS 961 Ethics in Human Research (on-line): This course is required of those students who are conducting research that will involve human subjects.

Additional Courses
In addition to required classes, a minimum of one elective is required. Electives are chosen by students in consultation with their supervisor and thesis advisory committee. There are several courses offered by CH&E faculty which may meet this requirement:

CHEP 801.3 - Epidemiology 2
CHEP 806.3 - Applied Statistical Methods for Follow-up Data
CHEP 808.3 - Complex Survey Data Analysis
CHEP 810.3  – Advanced Topics in Clinical Trials
CHEP 814.3  – Closing the Gap: Global Health and Social Inequities
CHEP 815.3 – Food Systems and Community Health
CHEP 816.3 - Population Health Intervention Research (PHIR)
CHEP 818.3 - Advanced Qualitative Health Research Methods in Population and Public Health
CHEP 819.3 - Colonization and its Implact on Indigenous Health and Healing
CHEP 898's - Special Topics
  • CHEP 898.3 - Understanding the COVID-19 pandemic, to better prepare for the next pandemic, offered Sept 2020, next offering TBD
  • CHEP 898.3 - Introduction to Realism: Philosophy, Methodology and Practice: Offered Spring 2020, Expected Spring 2022


Application procedure
All complete applications are reviewed by the CH&E Graduate Program Committee. Meeting minimum entry requirements DOES NOT guarantee acceptance. Recommendations by CH&E are based on the evaluation of academic ability, alignment of research interests with CH&E faculty, and availability of an appropriate thesis supervisor.

Application deadline
Applications for Fall admission for the following academic year open on September 15th and close December 15th.

Apply online to the Community and Population Health Sciences program

Additional Application documents to be uploaded on your online application

1.  A letter addressed to the Graduate Program Chair which includes:

    • A detailed statement of how your educational and/or work experience (including community involvement) have led you to become interested in pursuing a degree in Community and Population Health Sciences.  Also describe your educational and career goals and why you believe our program will help you meet these goals. (1-2 pages).
    • The following statement: If accepted into the MSc program, I will adhere to the residency policy requiring me to be on campus until core program requirements have been met, including thesis committee approval of pre-proposal and completion of required courses.

 2.  A writing sample (3-5 pages), appropriately referenced, presenting your view on a community health issue.  The health issue chosen should reflect the general area of research you hope to pursue in CH&E. The purpose of this is to help us assess your ability to organize your thoughts and express them coherently in writing, rather than knowledge of any particular subject matter. The essay should not simply reproduce factual information from another source.

3.  An up-to-date Curriculum Vitae.

The Doctorate (PhD) program in Community and Population Health Sciences is designed with considerable flexibility, recognizing that students come to the population health field with diverse backgrounds. This allows students, with their Advisory Committee, to create individualized programs that take into consideration their particular research interests and the areas in which they need additional development.

Through coursework and seminars, students will gain a more sophisticated understanding of community/population health theory and the research-policy-practice context. Designing and carrying out an independent research project provides an opportunity to further develop knowledge and skills around a specific problem.

Program Overview
Curriculum
Two core courses (6 credit units) and two elective courses (6 credit units) and non‐credit courses: CHEP 996 Thesis, CHEP 990 Department Seminar and on‐line courses, GPS 960 Introduction to Ethics and Integrity and
GPS 961 Ethics in Human Research.
Required Credit courses (course descriptions search)
CHEP 817.3 – Advanced Research Seminar in Population Health
An advanced methods course is required for your program and must be approved by the Graduate Program Chair. The Class may be either quantitative or Applied (i.e.CHEP 801: Epidemiology 2, or CHEP 806.3).

Statistical Methods for Follow Up Data, CHEP 808.3: Complex Survey Data Analysis) or Qualitative (i.e. CHEP 818.3: Advanced Qualitative Health Research Methods in Population and Public Health).

Students who have not taken courses that represent an adequate introduction to Community and Population Health Sciences at the Master’s level will be required to take additional core classes.

Two Electives: Graduate level courses related to the area of the thesis research and with the approval of the supervisor and thesis advisory committee. There are several courses offered by CH&E faculty which may meet this requirement:
CHEP 810.3  – Advanced Topics in Clinical Trials
CHEP 814.3  – Closing the Gap: Global Health and Social Inequities
CHEP 815.3 – Food Systems and Community Health
CHEP 816.3: Population Health Intervention Research (PHIR)
CHEP 819.3: Colonization and its Impacts on Indigenous Peoples Health and Healing
CHEP 898's - Special Topics:
  • Chep 899.3: Understanding the COVID-19 pandemic, to better prepare for the next pandemic, offered Sept 2020, next offering TBD
  • CHEP 898.3: Introduction to Realism, Philosophy, Methodology and Practice: Offered Spring 2020, expected spring 2022.

In addition to coursework, all Ph.D. students are required to successfully complete a comprehensive exam. Students take this exam once their required coursework is complete and before they begin their doctoral research, usually in their second year of program. A student passing the comprehensive exam is deemed a Ph.D. candidate

Application procedure
Application deadline
Applications for Fall admission for the following academic year open on September 15th and close December 15th.

To apply to the PhD program, students MUST have a CH&E faculty supervisor confirmed.

Apply online to the Community and Population Health Sciences program

Additional Application documents must be uploaded into your online application.

  1. A letter addressed to the Graduate Program Chairperson which includes:

-   A detailed statement of how your educational and/or work experience (including community involvement) have led you to become interested in pursuing a degree in Community and Population Health Sciences.  Also describe your educational and career goals and why you believe our program will help you meet these goals. (2-3 pages)

- The following statement:
If accepted into the PhD program, I will adhere to the residency policy requiring me to be on campus until core program requirements have been met, including thesis committee approval of pre-proposal, completion of required courses and successful completion of the comprehensive exam.

2.  A description of proposed thesis research (3-5 pages), appropriately referenced.

3.  A letter from the proposed PhD supervisor indicating agreement to supervise.

In addition to our MSc and PhD graduate programs, CH&E is involved in the delivery of MSc and PhD programs in Biostatistics in collaboration with Dept. of Math/Statistics and the School of Public Health.

PHPM Postgraduate MD Program

Program Overview and Contact

Public Health and Preventive Medicine (PHPM) is a 5-year post-graduate medical specialty training program.

University of Saskatchewan offers a variety of public health experiences in rural, northern and urban settings as well as the provincial level to provide a well-balanced learning environment. The small size of the program will ensure a greater ability to exercise responsibility through the program, and to adapt training to their career goals.

The University of Saskatchewan has a unique combination of academic units related to health issues, including a veterinary college, agriculture college, school of public health, school of the environment, school of public policy, and a world class vaccine development centre.

Program Director: 
Dr. Cory Neudorf
Phone: 306-966-2276 
Program Administrative Assistant:
Amanda Willms
Phone: 306-966-8752

Looking for more details about applying for a Public Health and Preventive Medicine residency position at University of Saskatchewan?

Visit the CaRMS website and search by University or by program to find out details about the program and the application process for Canadian graduates or international graduates.

PGY1

  • Basic clinical science training including urban and rural primary care, pediatrics, internal medicine, emergency medicine, geriatrics, and mental health and addictions.

PGY2

  • Introduction to Public Health rotation (Saskatoon Health Region)
  • Academic year either through the course work of a Master of Public Health degree, or a Master's degree in Epidemiology, or in Community and Population Health Sciences.
  • Practicum / Public Health Intelligence rotation (Saskatoon Public Health Observatory and the Health Quality Council).

PGY3

  • Complete practicum / Public Health Intelligence rotation and the remaining requirements of the academic course work,
  • Environmental Public Health rotation (Saskatoon Health Region and School of Environment),
  • Health Promotion and Health Equity rotation (Saskatoon Health Region).

PGY4

  • Communicable Disease Control and Immunization rotation (Saskatoon or Regina),
  • Provincial Public Health rotation (Ministry of Health in Regina),
  • Northern or rural public health rotation.

PGY5

  • Public Health Leadership rotation (Regina or Saskatoon)
  • Elective time (6 months)

As well as being a good learning environment for educating public health "generalists", there are the academic resources to support other career goals in the specialty, whether that includes academic medicine, medical epidemiology, administrative medicine or a combination practice and public health work.

For details about the program and application process visit the CaRMS website

Details about the specialty.

What do public health physicians do?

Affiliated Units/Centres

The CRSU provides multi-faceted research assistance to all faculty members, residents, students, and researchers within the College of Medicine. Investigators across the basic medical, clinical, and population health sciences can access support for study design, sample size/power calculation, data management, analysis, and manuscript revision. Requests to review funding applications are also welcome.  Support is provided by doctoral-level biostatisticians and biostatistical graduate students—all at zero cost.

The CRSU assists with 80 to 100 research projects annually at varying stages of development, although engagement early in the research process is encouraged. Support requests can be initiated by completing the CRSU Intake Form

Please note: given the frequent overlap of multiple requests during peak periods, 2-3 weeks may be required before an initial appointment can be made. 

The CRSU aims to contribute towards maximizing the research productivity of the College of Medicine research community. To that end, support is often ongoing in nature, frequently culminating in conference presentation and publication of project findings. CRSU acknowledgment and possibly shared authorship, at the dissemination of results is requested if a significant contribution has been made by CRSU staff.         

Departments within the College of Medicine aiming to encourage the development of quantitative research knowledge/skills among their faculty and residents can request academic presentations on related topics of interest by CRSU staff. Basic instruction in the use of SAS (a statistical program frequently used in statistical analysis) is also offered to individuals within the College of Medicine on an annual basis, usually in September/October, for a minimal cost.    

Please  Contact the CRSU office with inquiries.

Social Accountability is a division within the College of Medicine housed in the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology. It supports a number of programs and initiatives that address community health needs including Aboriginal health, primary health care, urban and rural under-served areas, gender and equity, eco-health, immigrant and refugee health and global health.

Dr. Carrie Bourassa (PhD) is the Scientific Director of the Institute of Indigenous Peoples Health (IIPH) and she is also the Nominated Principal Investigator of Morning Star Lodge. Dr. Bourassa has over 20 years of experience working with Indigenous communities to support Indigenous health and research. 

The Morning Star Lodge (MSL) is an Indigenous community-based health research lab in Regina, Saskatchewan, situated within Treaty 4 Territory and housed at the University of Saskatchewan. Funded in 2010, MSL hosts a number of research grants and utilizes a team of students at the undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate levels, trainees, Research Assistants, Community Partners, and Highly Qualified Personnel (HQP).

The lab was named in ceremony and continues to be guided through ceremony by Elders, Knowledge Keepers, academics and community mentors. The research is identified and directed by Indigenous community partnerships. Elders and Knowledge Keepers guide our research work based on the concept that, “Wisdom Water (community knowledge) is at the centre of research and the Hunter-Gatherers (researchers) have a responsibility to act in an ethical way and undertake research by, with, and at the direction of the community”this teaching comes from one of our guiding Elders.

At the lab our team is trained in ethical engagement with Indigenous communities, including the OCAP® principles of Ownership, Control, Access and Possession (www.FNIGC.ca/OCAP). The Tri-Council Policy Statement (TCPS) training - Chapter 9 is also foundational to our work. The TCPS 2 Ethical Research principles remind us to utilize the concepts of reciprocity, the collective, building relationships, giving back, holism, responsibility and respect. The MSL actively supports the training of Indigenous communities, undergraduate and graduate students through community partnerships and research agreements. This builds capacity within the communities to take ownership over their research, which is the desired outcome. Community Research Assistants and Community Research Advisory Committees (CRACs) are integral to this process.

The lab has a unique open concept environment and employs a reciprocal learning and mentorship model to help build community capacity. Reciprocal Learning and mentorship means to make learning a two-way process, ensuring that the teaching/learning relationships between faculty/Elders/Knowledge Keepers and HQPs/Trainees/Research Assistants/Community Partners opens up new levels of understanding. Learning is also holistic, reflexive, interconnected, reflective and relational.

The lab forms partnerships across Canada and beyond to provide training opportunities with experts from around the world and attracts Visiting Fellows and Post-Doctoral Scholars that provides a training environment that is second to none. Our past work has opened many doors for Indigenous communities to become engaged in the research as co-researchers, presenting at conferences and co-authoring journal publications. These are the tangible outcomes of undertaking Indigenous research with Indigenous communities in real partnerships.

The mission of the Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU) is to be a centre of excellence in research that will create new knowledge and understandings of population health, contribute to health policy and planning, inform public policy at all levels of governance, incorporate a population health perspective into the education of health professionals, and be a resource for public debate on population health.

The Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit is a bi-university health research unit based at the Universities of Regina and Saskatchewan. At the University of Saskatchewan, SPHERU offices are located within the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology.

Research

  1. Population health intervention research
  2. Health equity
  3. Social epidemiology and determinants of health
  4. Respiratory health/rural population health/occupational health (with CCHSA)
  5. Child health research
  6. Gender work and health
  7. Cultural identity and health
  8. Global health
  9. One Health
  10. HIV prevention and care
  11. Food security/food systems research
  12. Medical education pedagogy
  13. Aging
  14. Disabilities, chronic disease prevention and management
  15. Community engagement                                                   
  16. Health system, health services research and quality improvement                                                         
  17. Patient oriented research       
  18. Macroeconomics and health
  19. Social movements and health/health activism
  20. Midwifery/sexual and reproductive health rights
  21. Research design and methods

Quantitative Health Research

  • Longitudinal data analysis
  • Clinical Trials and Survival Analysis
  • Complex Survey Data Analysis 

Qualitative Health Research
Mixed Methods Research

Saskatoon HIV/AIDS Research Endeavour
As part of the College of Medicine, the Saskatoon HIV/AIDS Research Endeavour has partnered with AIDS Saskatoon to be the Saskatchewan Regional Team for the CIHR REACH Community Based Research (CBR) Collaborative Centre in HIV/AIDS. 

The CIHR REACH CBR Collaborative Centre in HIV/AIDS is providing infrastructure to build CBR capacity in HIV across Canada, and regionally here in Saskatchewan. Building on the successful foundation of the CIHR Centre for Research Evidence in Action for Community Health in HIV/AIDS (REACH) -- a national collaborative research network, we are establishing a vibrant, sustainable national collaborative among HIV/AIDS researchers, people living with HIV, community-based organizations, clinicians and policy makers that fosters rigorous, relevant CBR that will improve the health and well-being of people with or at risk of HIV. The Centre provides direct financial and infrastructure support to seven Core Regional Teams that will guide and drive regional initiatives that respond to local needs. 

With the academic leadership of Dr. Ryan Meili and Dr. Michael Schwandt at the University of Saskatchewan, and the community leadership of Heather Byrne, Executive Coordinator at AIDS Saskatoon, the Saskatchewan Regional CBR Team became fully operational in June 2013 through the establishment of a dedicated CBR Research Coordinator in Saskatoon. 

Our vision is to create a network of academics, community members, and organizations to collaborate on CBR projects, working together to strengthen CBR capacity at a grassroots level. The regional CBR engagement strategy involves connecting this network to identify key priorities for HIV research and resource mobilization in Saskatchewan. These priorities will drive the development of impact-oriented research, consulting on all aspects of the research process. 

For more information on the Saskatchewan HIV/AIDS Community Based Research Collaborative Centre please contact Ryan Meili, at ryan.meili@usask.


Saskatchewan Alliance for Youth and Community Well-being (SAYCW)

What is the SAYCW?

The Saskatchewan Alliance for Youth and Community Well-being (SAYCW) is comprised of over 30 partner organizations committed to improving the health and well-being of youth and communities in Saskatchewan. Stakeholder representation includes the health and education sectors, First Nations authorities, First Nations and Métis Elders, Francophone, federal and provincial government, and academia. A complete list of member organizations is available at www.saycw.com (members section). SAYCW is governed by a Steering Committee and co-chaired by the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency and the League of Educational Administrators, Directors, and Superintendents of Saskatchewan.

What is the Alliance working on?

One of the key activities of SAYCW is a youth survey that focuses on a variety of topics and health factors: general and dental health, sun and UV exposure, food, physical activity, screen time, sleep, substance abuse, school engagement and support, feelings, safety, suicide and self-harm, and sexual health. Providing local information that is most relevant to schools, communities and organizations interested in improving youth health and well-being is one of the main goals of the survey.

How can my school participate in the survey?

For more information about SAYCW or the Youth Health Survey, visit their website or contact Adel Panahi at (306)966-1048


SPOR

The Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) in Primary and Integrated Health Care (PIHCI) is a “network of networks”, a national research initiative linking research networks across Canada on projects designed to address front-line issues in health care delivery.

SPOR PIHCI brings together researchers, patients, policy analysts and health care professionals providing a bridge from research to front-line implementation. Research projects are designed to address current challenges in the health care system bringing greater quality, accountability and accessibility of health care for Canadians. Membership is open to anyone with an interest in primary and integrated health care research.

Contact Us:

Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) Network - Primary and Integrated Health Care
3123, E-wing  Health Sciences Building
104 Clinic Place
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, SK   S7N 5E5

PH: (306) 966-2093;  Fax: (306) 966-7920
janice.braden@usask.ca

Clinical Research Support Unit (CRSU)

The CRSU provides multi-faceted research assistance to all faculty members, residents, students, and researchers within the College of Medicine. Investigators across the basic medical, clinical, and population health sciences can access support for study design, sample size/power calculation, data management, analysis, and manuscript revision. Requests to review funding applications are also welcome.  Support is provided by doctoral-level biostatisticians and biostatistical graduate students—all at zero cost.

The CRSU assists with 80 to 100 research projects annually at varying stages of development, although engagement early in the research process is encouraged. Support requests can be initiated by completing the CRSU Intake Form

Please note: given the frequent overlap of multiple requests during peak periods, 2-3 weeks may be required before an initial appointment can be made. 

The CRSU aims to contribute towards maximizing the research productivity of the College of Medicine research community. To that end, support is often ongoing in nature, frequently culminating in conference presentation and publication of project findings. CRSU acknowledgment and possibly shared authorship, at the dissemination of results is requested if a significant contribution has been made by CRSU staff.         

Departments within the College of Medicine aiming to encourage the development of quantitative research knowledge/skills among their faculty and residents can request academic presentations on related topics of interest by CRSU staff. Basic instruction in the use of SAS (a statistical program frequently used in statistical analysis) is also offered to individuals within the College of Medicine on an annual basis, usually in September/October, for a minimal cost.    

Please  Contact the CRSU office with inquiries.


Healthcare Research and Quality Improvement 

Healthcare Research and Quality Improvement (HRQI) supports vital research to improve clinical decision-making, advance patient safety, decrease medical errors and enhance health care quality and access. Also, HRQI is uniquely positioned to support best practice research and to help promote its dissemination to improve primary care in Saskatchewan.

HRQI recognizes the importance of research into the science of primary care and patient-centred outcomes. We enthusiastically support these efforts believe that it must continue to have adequate resources to pursue its goals.

The HRQI key areas of focus include:

  • Safety and Quality: Reduce the risk of harm by promoting the delivery of the best possible care.
  • Effectiveness: Improve health care outcomes by encouraging the use of evidence to make informed health care decisions.
  • Efficiency: Transform research into practice to facilitate more extensive access to effective health care service and reduce unnecessary costs.

Evidence-based clinical practice requires HRQI-supported healthcare research in areas such as Practice-Based Research, practice transformation, patient quality and safety in hospital and non-hospital settings. Saskatchewan healthcare system relies on research developed to answer key clinical questions based on the Saskatchewan’s effective health care program to help clinicians make better treatment choices. HRQI provides the critical evidence reviews needed to answer questions on the common acute, chronic, and comorbid conditions that family physicians see daily. HRQI research also examines health information technology to provide the evidence to inform meaningful use policy and practice so that health IT can be used more effectively to improve the quality of Saskatchewan health care.

Please   Contact the HRQI office with inquiries.

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Contact

General Email


Postal Address
:
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology
Box 7, Health Science Building, 107 Wiggins Road
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
S7N 5E5

Courier Address:
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology
Rm 3247 - E wing - Health Sciences
104 Clinic Place
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N-2Z4

Email Prefered method of contact
Phone:
306-966-7946 long distance calls cannot be returned
Fax:
  306-966-7920

Department Head:
Dr. Anne Leis

Department Head's Secretary:
Kathy Evans
(306) 966-7945

Graduate Secretary:
Stephanie Kehrig
(306) 966-7946

Department Secretary:
Cheryl Bolster 
(306) 966-7944