General Information

The College of Medicine offers seven different graduate programs that exist under the areas of biomedical science, health science, and community health and epidemiology. Each program falls under the responsibility of the College of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, and is associated with specific departments that lie within the College of Medicine. The graduate programs function as independant entities and maintain unique requirements for admission and completion. Please see below for more information about each program.

Biomedical Graduate Programs

Anatomy and Cell Biology (ACB) is the study of the structure, function and development of organisms at the molecular, subcellular, cellular, tissue and organ levels. Areas of specialization for research training include: molecular, cellular and tissue biology, developmental biology, neurobiology, functional anatomy, and advanced anatomical imaging.

The ACB graduate program is associated with the Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology within the College of Medicine, and offers a graduate program leading to either a M.Sc. and/or Ph.D. degree. Please see the ACB graduate program website for more information.

Biochemistry (BIOC) seeks to explain life in chemical terms. The basic goal of the science of biochemistry is to determine how the collections of inanimate objects that constitute living organisms interact with each other to maintain and perpetuate life. Areas of specialization for research training include: analytical biochemistry, cell biochemistry, cell biology and cancer, enzymes and metabolism, nucleic acids and gene expression, plant biochemistry, and protein structure and molecular mechanism.

The BIOC graduate program is associated with the Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Immunology within the College of Medicine, and offers a graduate program leading to either a M.Sc. and/or Ph.D. degree. Please see the BIOC graduate program website for more information.

Microbiology and Immunology (MCIM) is the scientific discipline that has arisen from analysing the nature of microbes and host-microbe interactions. Areas of specialization for research training include: cellular and molecular biology of eukaryotes, microbial genetics and molecular biology, immunology, medical microbiology, microbial physiology, and virology.

The MCIM graduate program is associated with the Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Immunology within the College of Medicine, and offers a graduate program leading to either a M.Sc. and/or Ph.D. degree. Please see the MCIM graduate program website for more information.

Pharmacology (PCOL) is concerned with the properties of chemical compounds, in relation to their interactions with living organisms. It provides the basis for the discovery and study of drug actions, either as therapeutic agents or as tools in physiological research. Areas of specialization for research training include: cancer, molecular biology and chemotherapy, cardiovascular and endocrine pharmacology, clinical pharmacology, neurochemistry, neuropharmacology, and psychopharmacology.

The PCOL graduate program is associated with the Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology within the College of Medicine, and offers a graduate program leading to either a M.Sc. and/or Ph.D. degree. Please see the PCOL graduate program website for more information.

Physiology (PHSI) is the study of life and how living cells and tissues function, enabling organisms to live and interact with their environment. It provides the basis for the discovery and study of drug actions, either as therapeutic agents or as tools in physiological research. Areas of specialization for research training include: comparative respiratory and cardiovascular physiology, neurophysiology, vascular function, ion channels and endogenous gases, calcium channels and neuroendocrine secretion, hemoxygenase system, and cardiovascular pathology.

The PHSI graduate program is associated with the Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pharmacology within the College of Medicine, and offers a graduate program leading to either a M.Sc. and/or Ph.D. degree. Please see the PHSI graduate program website for more information.

Health Sciences Graduate Program

The Health Sciences (HSC) Graduate Program is a unique research based program open to all departments within the College of Medicine. The areas of study encompassed by the program are extensive including, but not limited to, translational and/or clinical aspects of human disease, healthy living, social accountability, and biomedical research projects with clinical translation. The flexible nature of a research-based program allows students to develop a more profound respect for all aspects of the research process, and refine their professional skills for future applications.

The HSC graduate program is associated with all departments, divisions, and schools within the College of Medicine, and offers a graduate program leading to either a M.Sc. and/or Ph.D. degree. Please see the HSC graduate program website for more information.

Community and Population Health Sciences Graduate Program

Community and Population Health Sciences is concerned with understanding the individual and collective factors that determine health, and applying this knowledge to maintain and improve the health status of populations. The term ‘community’ reflects the historic emphasis of our field on the creation, protection, and promotion of health within the context of communities, which may be geographic or based on shared identity and social ties

The Community and Population Health Sciences graduate program is associated with the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology within the College of Medicine, and offers a graduate program leading to either a M.Sc. and/or Ph.D. degree. Please see the CH&E graduate program website for more information.