About Us

Our department (CH&E) is concerned with understanding the individual and collective factors that determine health and applying this knowledge to maintain and improve the health status of population’s and reduce inequities in health status between groups.  The term ‘community’ reflects the historic emphasis of our field on the creation, protection, and promotion of health within the context of communities, which may be geographic or based on shared identity and social ties.

Welcome to the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology! It is a great place to learn, work and live. The Faculty’s diverse backgrounds and training combined with a wealth of experiences create excellent opportunities for academic development as well as ground-breaking and meaningful research.

 It is a place where each faculty, each staff, each student is also encouraged to show leadership and contribute to the collective.  Our teaching, research and social engagement focus on population health with a lens on social justice and equity for all.

Students, expect to be inspired by your studies, encouraged to think out of the box and to push yourself. You will be called to engage at the community level to make a difference and be nurtured by great change leaders.

It is also a place to have fun and to grow a deeper appreciation of diversity in a creative and safe environment. One of the best measures of success is the testimony of many of our graduates who currently occupy leadership positions in the health care system, in public health, in academia, in community and government.

- Dr. Anne Leis, Department Head

Our Vision
We envision a society in which all people have equitable opportunity to experience optimal health, shaped by evidence-informed policies and practices and based on principles of sustainability.

Our Mission
We create, synthesize and translate knowledge for evidence-informed policies and practices which support population health equity locally and globally.

Values
1. Respect
is defined as mutual acceptance and encouragement of people’s critical thinking and the diversity of persons, communities and cultures.
Behaviours which demonstrate respect

    • We address the needs and concerns of student, faculty and staff.
    • We use participative decision making.
    • We consult with and value the views of others
    • We encourage respectful collegial discussion and critical examination of diverse opinions.
    • We value other people’s perspectives, time and space.

2. Fairness involves exercising impartiality and equity in interpersonal relationships as well as balancing conflicting interests.
Behaviours which illustrate fairness

    • We consider the interests of all parties.
    • We treat others equitably with dignity.
    • We provide timely and constructive feed-back.
    • We support equitable relationships with partners.
    • We practice collaboration through regular communications and equitable distribution of powers among stakeholders.
    • We work within and follow ethical principles and guidelines.
    • As a department we provide fair access to learning and funding opportunities for all students.
    • As a department we provide fair access to departmental support and professional development opportunities for all faculty and staff.

 3. Excellence refers to the achievement of exceptionally high quality in academic standards, service to the community and innovation.
Behaviours which demonstrate excellence

    • We support perseverance in the pursuit of challenging goals
    • We are committed to be active participants in the excitement and enrichment of a learning community.
    • We support high achievement in students work habits and personal career’s goals.
    • We promote curiosity and critical thinking in teaching and research.
    • We vigorously pursue research for the benefit of persons and communities.
    • We model and mentor commitment to quality.
    • We foster new ideas and innovation in all we do.
    • We are open to constructive criticism through peer reviews and students evaluations

4. Professionalism refers to a commitment to abide by high ethical standards of behaviour and relevant group standards.  It requires an on-going personal commitment to integrity.
Behaviours which demonstrate Professionalism

    • We demonstrate inclusiveness in our day to day work.
    • We practice open communications and responsibility.
    • We know and apply ethical and professional standards of conduct.
    • We take responsibility for our actions.
    • We are actively engaged in research and activities which move knowledge to action.
    • We are prepared to take risks and learn from our mistakes.

Goals of the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology

Department as a Healthy Community

    1. To be a healthy and vibrant community providing a supportive working environment based on good communication and collaboration.
    2. To support faculty and staff professional development towards personal career goals.
    3. To integrate the goals of individual faculty and staff with Department priorities, responsibilities and funding.

Community Engagement and Social Accountability

    1. To develop relationships with community members, groups and agencies, with attention to issues of social justice.
    2. To share and mobilize the knowledge and skills of the department with diverse partners. This includes the provision of direct service to develop and maintain professional skills, and for remuneration.
    3. To continuously improve our outreach through on-going monitoring and feed-back.

Teaching and Learning

    1. To foster high-quality, scholarly teaching, based on an interdisciplinary evidence-informed Population Health approach.
    2. To prepare students to effectively perform the roles of practitioner, researcher, and/or educator. 
    3. To foster self-directed, life long and collaborative learning.
    4. To use evidence based methods to effectively self-evaluate and to assess courses and programs on a regular basis.

Research

    1. To conduct excellent, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research in population health with a focus on inequities locally and globally.
    2. To recruit and retain students and trainees who have succeeded in their preparatory fields, and mentor these students/trainees to become excellent researchers and research users.
    3. To develop diverse partnerships to co-create knowledge and find applications in society.
    4. To support one another, via formal and informal means, thereby creating and sustaining a vibrant research milieu that is one of the most successful in Canada for its size and resources.

Undergraduate Program

The faculty members of the department are closely involved in introducing concepts of population and community health to undergraduate medical students through courses/learning formats such as Medicine & Society, Clinical Integration, Community Service Learning, Certificate in Global Health, among others.

Some faculty participate in committees such as the curriculum committee, program evaluation committee, medical education oversight committee, that are responsible for the design, implementation and evaluation of the undergraduate medical curriculum.

Graduate Programs

The Department offers MSc and PhD programs in Community and Population Health Sciences. The College of Graduate Studies and Research (CGSR) sets the minimum entrance requirements for graduate programs and for English proficiency

Students will be admitted to the CGSR only upon the recommendation of CH&E.  Meeting minimum entry requirements DOES NOT guarantee acceptance. Recommendations by CH&E are based on the evaluation of academic ability, alignment of research interests with CH&E faculty, and availability of an appropriate thesis supervisor.

CH&E graduate students are required to be in residence until core program requirements have been met, including thesis committee approval of pre-proposal, completion of required courses, and completion of the comprehensive exam (PhD students).

Funding
A conservative estimate of the cost of one year of graduate studies at the University of Saskatchewan (including tuition, accommodation, other living/study expenses) is $18,000 CDN. The department DOES NOT guarantee student funding. A limited amount of money is available to support students and is allocated on a competitive basis according to students’ academic record. 

To be eligible for CH&E scholarship funding, students must have obtained at least 80% in the last two years of undergraduate or graduate study. Other funding may be available through faculty members’ research grants. All students are encouraged to apply for scholarships from local and national sources.

The MSc program in Community and Population Health Sciences prepares students for academic careers, including pursuit of doctoral studies, or to work in a variety of research-intensive environments. Students will learn about community and population health concepts, epidemiology, theory, and research;

develop basic skills in qualitative and quantitative research methods and project management; and gain hands-on experience in research through the completion of a thesis.

The MSc in Community and Population Health Sciences is a thesis-based program that can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Program Overview
Curriculum
Five core courses (15 credit units), one elective course (3 credit units), and non-credit courses: CHEP 994 Thesis, CHEP 990 Department Seminar and on-line courses, GSR 960 Introduction to Ethics and Integrity and GSR 961 Ethics in Human Research.

Courses
Required  Credit Courses (course descriptions search)
CHEP 800.3 – Epidemiology 1
CHEP 802.3 - Community and Population Health Research Methods
CHEP 811.3 - Professional Research Skills
CHEP 813.3 - Critical Perspectives in Interdisciplinary Population Health Research
plus one research methods class:
CHEP 805.3  – Biostatistics 1 
or
A qualitative research methods course
(PSY 809.3, JSGS 851.3 or equivalent).

Required Non-Credit Courses

CHEP 994 – Research Thesis
CHEP 990 – Departmental Seminar: All students are required to register in and attend the departmental seminar series. One core requirement of this seminar is presentation of thesis work at the annual “CH&E Student Research Day”. Completion of the seminar requirement occurs when the student’s thesis is successfully defended.
GSR 960 – Introduction to Ethics and Integrity (on-line): This course discusses ethical issues that graduate students may face during their time at the U of S.
GSR 961 Ethics in Human Research (on-line): This course is required of those students who are conducting research that will involve human subjects.

Additional Courses
In addition to required classes, a minimum of one elective is required. Electives are chosen by students in consultation with their supervisor and thesis advisory committee. There are several courses offered by CH&E faculty which may meet this requirement:
CHEP 806.3 -- Applied Statistical Methods for Follow-up Data
CHEP 810.3  – Advanced Topics in Clinical Trials
CHEP 814.3  – Closing the Gap: Global Health and Social Inequities
CHEP 815.3 – Food Systems and Community Health

Application procedure
All complete applications are reviewed by the CH&E Graduate Program Committee. Meeting minimum entry requirements DOES NOT guarantee acceptance. Recommendations by CH&E are based on the evaluation of academic ability, alignment of research interests with CH&E faculty, and availability of an appropriate thesis supervisor.

Application deadline
Applications for Fall admission for the following academic year open on September 15 and close February 1.

Apply online to the Community and Population Health Sciences program

Additional Application documents sent directly to the department

1.  A letter addressed to the Graduate Program Chair which includes:

    • A detailed statement of how your educational and/or work experience (including community involvement) have led you to become interested in pursuing a degree in Community and Population Health Sciences.  Also describe your educational and career goals and why you believe our program will help you meet these goals. (1-2 pages).
    • The following statement: If accepted into the MSc program, I will adhere to the residency policy requiring me to be on campus until core program requirements have been met, including thesis committee approval of pre-proposal and completion of required courses.

 2.  A writing sample (3-5 pages), appropriately referenced, presenting your view on a community health issue.  The health issue chosen should reflect the general area of research you hope to pursue in CH&E. The purpose of this is to help us assess your ability to organize your thoughts and express them coherently in writing, rather than knowledge of any particular subject matter. The essay should not simply reproduce factual information from another source.

3.  An up-to-date Curriculum Vitae.

The Doctorate (PhD) program in Community and Population Health Science is designed with considerable flexibility, recognizing that students come to the population health field with diverse backgrounds. This allows students, with their Advisory Committee, to create individualized programs that take into consideration their particular research interests and the areas in which they need additional development.

Through coursework and seminars, students will gain a more sophisticated understanding of community/population health theory and the research-policy-practice context. Designing and carrying out an independent research project provides an opportunity to further develop knowledge and skills around a specific problem.

Program Overview
Curriculum
Two core courses (6 credit units) and two elective courses (6 credit units) and non‐credit courses: CHEP 996 Thesis, CHEP 990 Department Seminar and on‐line courses, GSR 960 Introduction to Ethics and Integrity and
GSR 961 Ethics in Human Research.
Required Credit courses (course descriptions search)
CHEP 812.3 – Advanced Research Seminar in Population Health
An advanced methods course, either quantitative (CHEP 806.3 or equivalent) or qualitative. Approval by Graduate Program Chair required.

Students who have not taken courses that represent an adequate introduction to Community and Population Health Sciences at the Master’s level will be required to take additional core classes.

Two Electives: Graduate level courses related to the area of the thesis research and with the approval of the supervisor and thesis advisory committee. There are several courses offered by CH&E faculty which may meet this requirement:
CHEP 810.3  – Advanced Topics in Clinical Trials
CHEP 814.3  – Closing the Gap: Global Health and Social Inequities
CHEP 815.3 – Food Systems and Community Health

In addition to coursework, all Ph.D. students are required to successfully complete a comprehensive exam. Students take this exam once their required coursework is complete and before they begin their doctoral research, usually in their second year of program. A student passing the comprehensive exam is deemed a Ph.D. candidate

Application procedure
Application deadline
Applications for Fall admission for the following academic year open on September 15 and close February 1.

To apply to the PhD program, students MUST have a CH&E faculty supervisor confirmed.

Apply online to the Community and Population Health Sciences program

Additional Application documents sent directly to the department

  1. A letter addressed to the Graduate Program Chairperson which includes:

-   A detailed statement of how your educational and/or work experience (including community involvement) have led you to become interested in pursuing a degree in Community and Population Health Sciences.  Also describe your educational and career goals and why you believe our program will help you meet these goals. (2-3 pages)

- The following statement:
If accepted into the PhD program, I will adhere to the residency policy requiring me to be on campus until core program requirements have been met, including thesis committee approval of pre-proposal, completion of required courses and successful completion of the comprehensive exam.

2.  A description of proposed thesis research (3-5 pages), appropriately referenced.

3.  A letter from the proposed PhD supervisor indicating agreement to supervise.

In addition to our MSc and PhD graduate programs, CH&E is involved in the delivery of MSc and PhD programs in Biostatistics in collaboration with Dept. of Math/Statistics and the School of Public Health.

PHPM Postgraduate MD Program

Public Health/Preventative Medicine Postgraduate MD Program
Program Overview and Contact

The residency program is a medical postgraduate training program leading to Royal College certification as a specialist in Public Health / Preventive Medicine. This specialty focuses on the health of populations, on prevention, health promotion and health protection, using epidemiology and data analysis as its basic science.

Contact:

Program Director: 
Dr. Cory Neudorf
Phone: 306-966-2276 
E-mail: cory.neudorf@usask.ca

Program Coordinator:
Koreen Skjonsby
Phone: 306-966-8752
E-mail: kos374@mail.usask.ca

Looking for more details about applying for a Public Health and Preventative Medicine residency position at University of Saskatchewan?

Visit the CaRMS website and search by University or by program to find out details about the program and the application process for Canadian graduates or international graduates.

The curriculum is designed to meet Royal College requirements for the specialty, with the usual length of training after medical school of 5 years of postgraduate medical education tailored to support the candidate's career goals, whether those are related to a role in the public health system, as a medical epidemiologist, in clinical preventive medicine, an academic setting or in administrative medicine.

Elective time will be used to tailor the training to a candidate's career goals.

In order to provide the best experience for learning, a number of mandatory placements are provided outside of Saskatoon, including the rural or northern public health placement, a rotation at the Ministry of Health in Regina, and a 2 month placement in Environmental Health at BC Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. 

The PGY1 year will consist of basic clinic placements to provide an appropriate background for the candidate's future career as a PHPM specialist.

Department of Community Health and Epidemiology
Provides content expertise in the area of epidemiology and epidemiologic methods during the program.  It also houses a master's degree program which is one option for the academic content of the residency program.  Staff in the department have a particular focus on qualitative data as well quantitative methods.

The School of Public Health
The School of Public Health at the University of Saskatchewan also provides an MPH program with a wide range of courses appropriate for the specialty.


Program Strengths
The strengths of the program will be in helping residents learn how to function effectively as specialists in Public Health and Preventive Medicine within an integrated regionalized health care system, able to work in a public health department, and with other parts of the health care system.

The variety of public health experiences available in rural, northern, and urban settings as well as the provincial level will provide a well-balanced learning environment.  The small size of the program will also ensure a greater ability to exercise responsibility appropriate to the competence of individual residents as they progress through the program, and to adapt training to their career goals.

As well as being a good learning environment for educating public health "generalists" there are the academic resources to support other career goals in the specialty, whether that includes academic medicine, medical epidemiology, administrative medicine or a combination of clinical practice and public health work.

The University of Saskatchewan has a unique combination of academic units related to health issues, including a veterinary college, agriculture college, school of public health, school of the environment, school of public policy, and a world class vaccine development centre (Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization).

Being embedded in a relatively small health care system, this program will provide residents with the opportunity to get to know first-hand the important components of the public health system.

Because it is a small program, during the first years we will be linking with other western program for joint learning experiences where possible, both for the learning opportunities and to enable residents to meet their peers.

For details about the program and application process: www.carms.ca

For details about the specialty: www.rcpsc.org

Affiliated Units/Centres

Integrative Health Seminar
The Integrative Health Seminar is intended to promote innovation in healthcare by building bridges between research, education, practice, and public policy across a wide spectrum of medical specialties and health-related disciplines. Furthermore, it is intended to create integrative dialogue between a wide range of medical disciplines, organizational functions, and health-related paradigms.

The seminar normally runs on the second and fourth Tuesday of every month from late fall until early spring, and is held in the Sasktel Lecture Theatre in the Royal University Hospital Main Mall.

The audience typically includes physicians, nurses, and allied health providers, as well as researchers, managers, business and community leaders, and policy-makers from a wide spectrum of health-related disciplines.

Topics in recent years have included:

  • Nutritional approaches for the prevention and treatment of chronic conditions
  • Emotion work, emotional labour, and stress in the workplace
  • Planning and implementation of an integrative health centre
  • Integrative approaches for the treatment of menopause
  • Psychosocial strategies for the prevention and treatment of mild to moderate depression 

General inquiries:

Phone: 306-966-7935
Email: integrative.medicine@usask.ca 


Heggie Lecture in Integrative Medicine



In September 2005, the University of Saskatchewan gave final approval to the establishment of the Betty-Ann and Wade Heggie Lectureship in Integrative Medicine, the purpose of which was to support the cost of lectures and/or other delivery methods, and to provide continuing education opportunities for faculty, residents, and practitioners in the field of complementary and alternative medicine. 

The lectureship, which will exist in perpetuity, will provide resources to bring high profile, knowledgeable, and experienced physicians to the College of Medicine to address topics in complementary and alternative medicine.

About the Donors
Betty-Ann and Wade Heggie have both been prominent members of the business, volunteer, and philanthropic communities in this province for many years. Wade has been involved in aviation, life insurance, and financial planning, and has held prominent volunteer roles with several community-based organizations. Betty-Ann has had an illustrious career as a senior executive in corporate relations in the Potash Industry, and has held numerous directorships in the public and private sectors.

The Heggies have been wonderful supporters of the University of Saskatchewan, and have recently taken a leadership role in shaping the future of the University through their participation in the Thinking the World of Our Future campaign. They have also provided tremendous volunteer assistance in attracting other donors to the U of S over the past few years.

Wade and Betty-Ann have both had extensive personal experience at leading integrative health centres throughout North America.

This lectureship is the way that they have chosen to articulate their vision for integrative medicine in this province, with their own gift to the College of Medicine.


Social Change Seminar
The Social Change Seminar Series is intended to help researchers and practitioners to integrate their professional training and work experience with their passions and values, to influence the structural determinants of health. It is based upon the following premises:

  1. Many of the upstream determinants of health are closely linked to social and economic factors.
  2. In order to influence the determinants of health, it may therefore be necessary to understand the process of social change.
  3. Social change happens through a complex web of causation, in which small actions can make a big difference.
  4. Each of us is capable, in our own way, of exerting influence in the process of social change.

The seminar series will focus on the process of social change, and the role of the change agent.  It will address activities such as social innovation, social activism, and social entrepreneurship.

The intention is to feature pathfinders who have carved out innovative roles for themselves in the service of society.  One objective is to sensitize students to the possibility of innovative career paths as an avenue for becoming agents of social change.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the processes and mechanisms through which social change occurs.
  • Identify practical and effective strategies and tactics to influence the process of social change. 
  • Identify the characteristics of research that “makes a difference”.
  • Identify the factors that promote and enable the process of translating research findings into changes in health, economic, and/or social policy. 
  • Examine the dynamics of social movements in the twentieth century, to identify factors associated with the process of social change. 
  • Describe the lives of social innovators, social activists, and social entrepreneurs, in terms of career paths, lifestyle, work-life balance, sources of stress and satisfaction.
  • Learn how to integrate your talents, values and passions to make a difference in the world, and to help address the major challenges of our time.

Topics could include:

Models of change.  Relationship between individual, organizational, and social change. Directed and undirected change. 
Self-regulating systems.  Culture, values, ideologies.  Paradigm stress and paradigm shifts.  Thought-worlds and decision-making. 
Strategies and tactics for exerting influence.  Social movements and change agents.  Attitudes and belief systems.  Leadership and pathfinding.


Epstein Schnurr Award

Drs. Joe Schnurr and Michael Epstein have been collaborators on a number of healthcare initiatives since 1999. In 2002, they jointly co-founded the Program in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (renamed the Centre for Integrative Medicine in 2004), with considerable support and encouragement from the Senior Leadership Team in the College of Medicine.

This award, which will be presented annually, is intended to provide a graduating medical student with a monetary prize in recognition of demonstrated motivation, initiative, and achievement in the area of Integrative Medicine.

The award is a gift of $1,000.00, and is made possible through the generosity of Drs. Shirley (DeeDee) and Tom Maltman in collaboration with a consortium of philanthropists and physicians from the greater Saskatoon area.

Background

Dr. Schnurr is a family physician with advanced training in functional medicine, acupuncture, and integrative medicine. He was Medical Director of the Centre during the period 2004-12, and is currently an integrative physician with InspireHealth, a globally preeminent integrative cancer care centre in British Columbia.

Dr. Epstein is an educational and management consultant, specializing in strategic planning, organizational change, integrative medicine, and leadership development. He is Managing Director of the Centre for Integrative Medicine.

Integrative Medicine is healing-oriented medicine that takes account of the whole person (body, mind, and spirit) including all aspects of lifestyle. It emphasizes the therapeutic power of the doctor-patient relationship and makes use of all appropriate therapies, both conventional and complementary  

To promote and accelerate the advancement of Integrative Medicine within the province of Saskatchewan, a group of philanthropists and physicians have created the Drs. Epstein and Schnurr Award in Integrative Medicine, to be awarded annually to a graduating medical student who has shown motivation, initiative, and achievement in the area of Integrative Medicine.

This is a monetary award with a value of $1,000.00.

Application Process

Open to graduating medical students from the College of Medicine.  Proposals will include a one-page statement from the student including the following:

Interest in and knowledge of Integrative Medicine.

Specific activities that they have undertaken to advance their training in Integrative Medicine. This could potentially include conferences, workshops, and other related activities.

Plans to further their studies in Integrative Medicine or to include the philosophies of Integrative Medicine in their chosen specialty.

Proposals may include a letter of support from a faculty member or Integrative Practitioner.  

Additional information will be provided as the application process is announced.

Please note that applications are now closed.


Shirley Anne Bergman Award

Description

To honor their mother and to support the advancement of integrative medicine, the children of Shirley Bergman have created the Shirley Anne Bergman Award in Integrative Medicine to be awarded annually to a third or fourth year medical student that has shown an interest in, or aptitude for, the area of integrative medicine.

The award will enable the recipient to attend a scientific conference on integrative medicine, and will cover the cost of travel, accommodation, and conference fees, up to $2,000.

Background

Shirley Anne Bergman was a Saskatchewan woman, whom although she had no formal training, was a naturally gifted health care provider. She had a great respect for conventional medicine and inspired that interest in her children, three of whom pursued careers in healthcare, and two of whom are graduates of The University of Saskatchewan, College of Medicine.

Shirley's interest in healthcare extended beyond the boundaries of conventional medicine and into the realm of complementary and alternative therapies. She had an enquiring mind and sought to make sense of the growing body of knowledge in these areas, motivated in part by her search for additional treatment options to help her husband relieve his severe symptoms associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Shirley worked hard to search out the most safe and effective healthcare treatments from all sources.

She respected the work of complementary health practitioners, but never accepted their practices uncritically at face value. In this way Shirley embodied the concept of Integrative Medicine long before the term was ever coined:  

Integrative Medicine is healing-oriented medicine that takes account of the whole person (body, mind, and spirit) including all aspects of lifestyle. It emphasizes the therapeutic relationship and makes use of all appropriate therapies, both conventional and alternative.

To honor their mother and to support the advancement of Integrative Medicine, the children of Shirley Bergman have created the Shirley Anne Bergman award in Integrative Medicine, to be awarded annually to a third or fourth year medical student that has shown an interest in, or aptitude for, the area of Integrative medicine. This award is a travel bursary with a value of up to $2,000, to cover the cost of travel and conference fees for a national or international conference in Integrative Medicine.   

Application Process

To apply for the award, students are asked to send a brief statement which covers the following points:

The student’s background, interest and knowledge of integrative medicine.

Description of the student’s plans for further study in integrative medicine or plans to include the principles and practices of integrative medicine in the student’s chosen specialty.

Proposals may include a letter of support from a faculty member or integrative health practitioner.

Any other information that might be of relevance to the selection committee.

The conference to be attended will be decided upon in discussion between the award recipient and the Chair of the Award Committee. This may be a National or International conference and should be attended within one year of receiving the award (with possible exceptions).

Applications should be sent by email to:

Dr. Michael Epstein, Managing Director, Centre for Integrative Medicine, College of Medicine, integrative.medicine@usask.ca

Please note that applications are now closed.

The Clinical Research Support Unit is a source of biostatistical and epidemiological science to faculty, staff and students in biomedical and clinical sciences.

Get more information here.

Social Accountability is a division within the College of Medicine housed in the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology. It supports a number of programs and initiatives that address community health needs including Aboriginal health, primary health care, urban and rural under-served areas, gender and equity, eco-health, immigrant and refugee health and global health.

The mission of the Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU) is to be a centre of excellence in research that will create new knowledge and understandings of population health, contribute to health policy and planning, inform public policy at all levels of governance, incorporate a population health perspective into the education of health professionals, and be a resource for public debate on population health.

The Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit is a bi-university health research unit based at the Universities of Regina and Saskatchewan. At the University of Saskatchewan, SPHERU offices are located within the Department of Community Health & Epidemiology.

Research

  1. Population health intervention research
  2. Health equity
  3. Social epidemiology and determinants of health
  4. Respiratory health/rural population health/occupational health (with CCHSA)
  5. Child health research
  6. Gender work and health
  7. Cultural identity and health
  8. Global health
  9. One Health
  10. HIV prevention and care
  11. Food security/food systems research
  12. Medical education pedagogy
  13. Aging
  14. Disabilities, chronic disease prevention and management
  15. Community engagement                                                   
  16. Health system, health services research and quality improvement                                                         
  17. Patient oriented research       
  18. Macroeconomics and health
  19. Social movements and health/health activism
  20. Midwifery/sexual and reproductive health rights
  21. Research design and methods

Quantitative Health Research

  • Longitudinal data analysis
  • Clinical Trials and Survival Analysis
  • Complex Survey Data Analysis 

Qualitative Health Research
Mixed Methods Research

Saskatoon HIV/AIDS Research Endeavour
As part of the College of Medicine, the Saskatoon HIV/AIDS Research Endeavour has partnered with AIDS Saskatoon to be the Saskatchewan Regional Team for the CIHR REACH Community Based Research (CBR) Collaborative Centre in HIV/AIDS. 

The CIHR REACH CBR Collaborative Centre in HIV/AIDS is providing infrastructure to build CBR capacity in HIV across Canada, and regionally here in Saskatchewan. Building on the successful foundation of the CIHR Centre for Research Evidence in Action for Community Health in HIV/AIDS (REACH) -- a national collaborative research network, we are establishing a vibrant, sustainable national collaborative among HIV/AIDS researchers, people living with HIV, community-based organizations, clinicians and policy makers that fosters rigorous, relevant CBR that will improve the health and well-being of people with or at risk of HIV. The Centre provides direct financial and infrastructure support to seven Core Regional Teams that will guide and drive regional initiatives that respond to local needs. 

With the academic leadership of Dr. Ryan Meili and Dr. Michael Schwandt at the University of Saskatchewan, and the community leadership of Heather Byrne, Executive Coordinator at AIDS Saskatoon, the Saskatchewan Regional CBR Team became fully operational in June 2013 through the establishment of a dedicated CBR Research Coordinator in Saskatoon. 

Our vision is to create a network of academics, community members, and organizations to collaborate on CBR projects, working together to strengthen CBR capacity at a grassroots level. The regional CBR engagement strategy involves connecting this network to identify key priorities for HIV research and resource mobilization in Saskatchewan. These priorities will drive the development of impact-oriented research, consulting on all aspects of the research process. 

For more information on the Saskatchewan HIV/AIDS Community Based Research Collaborative Centre please contact Ryan Meili, at ryan.meili@usask.


Saskatchewan Alliance for Youth and Community Well-being (SAYCW)

What is the SAYCW?

The Saskatchewan Alliance for Youth and Community Well-being (SAYCW) is comprised of over 30 partner organizations committed to improving the health and well-being of youth and communities in Saskatchewan. Stakeholder representation includes the health and education sectors, First Nations authorities, First Nations and Métis Elders, Francophone, federal and provincial government, and academia. A complete list of member organizations is available at www.saycw.com (members section). SAYCW is governed by a Steering Committee and co-chaired by the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency and the League of Educational Administrators, Directors, and Superintendents of Saskatchewan.

What is the Alliance working on?

One of the key activities of SAYCW is a youth survey that focuses on a variety of topics and health factors: general and dental health, sun and UV exposure, food, physical activity, screen time, sleep, substance abuse, school engagement and support, feelings, safety, suicide and self-harm, and sexual health. Providing local information that is most relevant to schools, communities and organizations interested in improving youth health and well-being is one of the main goals of the survey.

How can my school participate in the survey?

For more information about SAYCW or the Youth Health Survey, visit www.saycw.com or contact Sylvie Horan at (306)966-6519 or email sylvie.horan@usask.ca


SPOR

The Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) in Primary and Integrated Health Care (PIHCI) is a “network of networks”, a national research initiative linking research networks across Canada on projects designed to address front-line issues in health care delivery.

SPOR PIHCI brings together researchers, patients, policy analysts and health care professionals providing a bridge from research to front-line implementation. Research projects are designed to address current challenges in the health care system bringing greater quality, accountability and accessibility of health care for Canadians. Membership is open to anyone with an interest in primary and integrated health care research.

Contact Us:

Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) Network - Primary and Integrated Health Care
3123, E-wing  Health Sciences Building
104 Clinic Place
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, SK   S7N 5E5

PH: (306) 966-2093;  Fax: (306) 966-7920
janice.braden@usask.ca

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Contact

General Email:  chep.info@usask.ca


Postal Address
:
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology
Box 7, Health Science Building, 107 Wiggins Road
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
S7N 5E5

Courier Address:
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology
Rm 3247 - E wing - Health Sciences
104 Clinic Place
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N-2Z4

Fax:  (306) 966-7920

Department Head:
Dr. Anne Leis

Department Head's Secretary:
Kathy Evans
(306) 966-7945

Graduate Secretary:
Cindy Elchuk
(306) 966-7946

Department Secretary:
Cheryl Bolster 
(306) 966-7944