About Us

What is Faculty Development?

Faculty Development assists college faculty in the achievement of their academic roles with an aim to enhance the experience of our learners and support the missions of our faculties.

How can we help?

Scheduling
Sometimes the workshops you want to attend may not be offered at a time or on a day that works for you. In an effort to help alleviate this problem, we offer flexible scheduling.

If you are interested in any of our events, please let us know which days and time will work best and those that won't work at all, and we'll contact you to set up the workshop at a time and day that is convenient for you.

Accreditation
For unaccredited educational events, physicians may claim self-study credits on their own initiative. Members of The College of Family Physicians of Canada may claim Mainpro-M2 credits; for further information please see the CFPC website. Members of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada may claim Maintenance of Certification program credits by reporting event hours with MAINPORT under "unaccredited activities" in Section 1; for further information please see the RCPSC website.

All participants will be provided with a certificate of completion.

What We Offer

Definition
Activities that promote application of scientifically derived principles to the planning, design, creation, implementation, and evaluation of effective and efficient student-centered teaching to facilitate learning

 

Courses Description
TIPS for Residents/TEME (Teaching Excellence for Medical Educators) Course for Residents TIPS is the College of Medicine’s full 2-day resident-as-teacher training course.  Topics include How People Learn, Motivation, Attention, Structure of a Teaching Session, PowerPoint for Teaching, Clinical Teaching Techniques, Feedback, & Cognitive Error.  The format involves much group discussion as well as microteaching practice with feedback.  All first year residents in the College are required to attend the TIPS course.
TIPS for Faculty/TEME (Teaching Excellence for Medical Educators) Course for Faculty


TEME (Teaching Excellence for Medical Educators) for Faculty is a two day workshop designed to enhance the participant’s expertise as an instructor through sessions in which selected instructional techniques will be analyzed, practiced and evaluated. The sessions include presentations, discussions and independent work. Participants prepare and present in small group, two ten-minute teaching sessions (micro teaches) from their own repertoire. On the second day, the participants will be divided into the following groups:

People who teach primarily in classroom settings practice and enhance valuable teaching skills including teaching large classes and foundational principles of student assessment.

People who teach primarily in a clinical setting will learn clinical teaching skills including how to use the Precepting Using Microskills method.

Objectives
We anticipate that by the end of the TEME course, you will be able to:

  • Write instructional objectives
  • Plan an instructional session with an appropriate Set, Body, and Closure
  • Deliver a planned instructional session
  • Use audiovisual aids effectively
  • Critique instructional sessions
  • Apply TIPS techniques to different types of instructional sessions
  • Choose to continue to strengthen your teaching skills and
  • Become an advocate for better teaching and learning at the College of Medicine
  • Give effective feedback.
Simulation Training

Advanced Skills in Simulation for Educators & Teachers (ASSET)

ASSET Foundations is a two-day course that provides a broad overview of core simulation concepts and principles to novice and intermediate simulation educators.  This interactive and immersive course provides a mix of didactic, small group and simulation-based activities.  By the end of the course, the participants will be able to design and run their own simulation, and feel comfortable facilitating the debriefing session that follows.

Teaching Orientation for New Faculty

Workshops
Active Learning Strategies

  • Introduction to Active Learning – Broad Strokes
  • What do I do to get my students more actively engaged?
  • Cooperative Learning
  • Case Studies
  • Teaching Large Classes
  • Promoting Active Learning using Zgames
  • Student Response Systems
  • Flipped Classroom

Student Learning

  • How people learn
  • From novice to expert
  • Seeing the world through a student’s eyes
  • Learning, Prior Learning and Transfer of Learning
  • The importance of Alignment
  • The Content Jungle: How to decide what’s relevant and how much is enough
  • Techniques to promote Self-directed Learning

Clinical Teaching

  • Preparing to Teach in a Clinical Setting
  • Clinical Teaching Skills
  • Assessing Clinical Skills
  • Issues in Clinical Teaching
  • Clinical Decision Making
  • Writing Clinical Scenarios for teaching, learning and assessment

Student Assessment

  • Making Pass/Fail Work
  • Foundational Principles of Assessment
  • Writing Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ)
  • Writing Clinical Decision making questions using A Key Feature Approach
  • Peer-Evaluation – Best Practices
  • Examination Blueprinting

Competence by Design
Other Core Teaching Skills

  • Classroom Incivilities: Minimizing Disruption
  • Writing Learning Objectives Right
  • Higher Order Thinking
  • Ethical Principles in University Teaching
  • Using Portfolios

Problem-based Learning Tutor Training
Using Technology in Teaching

  • Creating Podcasts
  • Pedagogically sound Webinars
  • Student Response Systems – TopHat
  • One45
  • Blackboard basics
  • Using Examsoft

To request a workshop, or get more information, please contact Deboleena Chakraborty.

Check calendar for available September dates.

Other Resources for Instructional Development

IAMSE Webcast Audio Seminar Series Archives
Fall 2015 IAMSE Webcast Audio Seminar Series
Winter 2016 IAMSE Webcast Audio Seminar Series
Spring 2016 IAMSE Webcast Audio Seminar Series

Definition
Activities that support the expansion of capacity to be effective in leadership roles and processes

Workshops
Courses offered by the Saskatchewan Medical Association
Courses offered by the Edwards School of Business

Upcoming Leadership Development Opportunities
2017 Collaborative Change Leadership™ January - December 2017 Toronto, Canada A Certificate Program for Healthcare and Health Education Leaders

Definition
Activities that support improving and increasing professional capabilities through access to education and training opportunities in the workplace

Workshops
University of Saskatchewan New Faculty Orientation
Manuscript Writing

Resources
Standards for Tenure and Promotion

Internal Funding Support
Internal Funding Programs

Research Acceleration Program (RAP)
To provide financial assistance for proposal development expenses relating to Large Scale Tri-Agency and Large Scale Non Tri-Agency funding applications.
Deadlines: May 1 & September 15
Contact: Janice Michael, Financial Development Specialist, Strategic Research Initiatives, 306-966-2091

Funding to support manuscript preparation, publishing
Publications Fund from Research Services: Up to $1000, and possibly $1500 (when funding is available).

Conference Funding
Members of the University academic, student or administrative community are eligible to apply for a Conference Fund Grant ranging in value from $250 and $5,000.
Deadlines: January 1, May 1, and September 1
Contact: Office of the Vice-Provost, 306-966-8490/306-966-1923

Research Metrics
Research metrics measure the impact of scholarly works. Various metrics have been developed to track the impact of individual articles, authors, and journals.
The Research Metrics guide will introduce you to many of these measures and how to apply them to your work

Library Support for Research
The University Library collaborates with researchers through our Liaison Librarian Program, by providing information resources and research tools, facilitating scholarly communication, and linking with the University’s Signature Research areas.

Technology Training & Support
ICT Services & Support
ICT Service Desk
Training Service
How to get your NSID?
How to access files from off-campus?
Software applications available for faculty
Access to software - NVivo, R project Statistical Computing, SAS, SPSS and Stata
Remote Access to Software

Lynda: All U of S faculty, staff and students have free and unlimited access to lynda.com, an online training resource containing thousands of videos on the latest software tools and skills.

Definition
We use a collaborative, result-orientated process to help individual faculty (or faculty groups) of the College of Medicine in achieving a specific, professional goal.  We use a collaborative, result-orientated process to help individual faculty (or faculty groups) of the College of Medicine in achieving a specific, professional goal. 

Scholarship
Master’s Program
Currently, a Masters in Educational Administration (with a specialization in Medical Education) is offered through the College of Education.

Faculty Resources

As teachers, CoM faculty should be aware of the technical standards for our undergraduate students, Essential Skills and Abilities Required for the Study of Medicine, which can be found within the Student Information Guide

CoM Faculty Development - Announces creo™ available for you to register now!
Want to do some research? Wondering where to start? Start with creo™! This is an online research skills development course available free this year for College of Medicine faculty! There is limited capacity, so sign up now online.
 
Go to the “register” button to the right of the screen and follow the instructions. U of S CoM faculty are all in one group – so you select “University of Saskatchewan” when you register.
 
Once you register there will be a 24 hour turn-around during the work week. Once your registration is confirmed, you will get an email and you are ready to go! This course is done at your own pace. All learning modules are unlocked, so it’s very self-directed.  Once in the program, you can tailor creo™ to meet your specific needs/interests.
 
Please complete the evaluation questions as a part of this trial. They are embedded in the program and we will be monitoring the collective experience to determine if we will continue to offer the course in the future. Happy to have your feedback anytime!

Medical Education Conferences

Key meetings at local, provincial, national and international venues, of interest to those involved in medical and health professions education.


Title/Description

Date

Location

Development Category (4 pillars)

Conference Level (Local/Provincial/National/International

Health and Medical Education Scholarship Symposium

February 22-23, 2017

University of Calgary, Alberta

Educational Developers Conference

February 22-24, 2017

University of Guelph, Ontario

National

Western Emergency Department Operations Conference (WEDOC)

April 6-7

University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon

SRPC - Society of Rural Physicians of Canada

April 6-8, 2017

Calgary, AB

SIU School of Medicine Workshop:  Training and  Using SPs for Teaching and Assessment

April 24- 28, 2017

Springfield, Illinois

Canadian Conference on Medical Education (CCME)

April 29- May2, 2017

Winnipeg, Manitoba

National

Society of Teachers FM - STFM

May 5-9, 2017

San Diego, CA

SaskRenewal

May 27-28, 2017

Watrous, SK

International Association of Medical Science Educators (IAMSE)

June 10-13, 2017

Burlington, Vermont

International

DAFM Spring Retreat

June 14-17, 2017

Regina, SK

University of Chicago

June 15-16, 2017

Chicago, IL

AHE (Assessment in Higher Education Conference)

 

June 28-29, 2017

 

 

 

WONCA

June 28- July 1, 2017

Prague, CZ

AMEE - Association for Medical Education (FD)

August 25-27, 2017

Helsinki, FIN

Physician Health

September 7-9, 2017

Ottawa, ON

CFPSK ASA (FM Review)

September 21-23, 2017

Regina, SK

ICRE-International Conference on Residency Education

October 21-23, 2017

TBD

CLIC

October 22-25, 2017

Singapore

FMF

November 8-11, 2017

Montreal, QC

NAPCRG - North American Primary Care Research  Grp November 17-21, 2017 Montreal, QC
St. Paul's Hospital CME November 21-24, 2017 Vancouver, BC

Title/Description

Date

Location

Development Category (4 pillars)

Conference Level (Local/Provincial/National/International

APMEC (Asia Pacific Medical Education Conference)

January 13-17, 2016

Singapore

International

Australian & New Zealand Association for Health Professional Educators (ANZAHPE) and the Ottawa Conference 2016

March 19-23, 2016

Perth, Western Australia

International

AMEE (Association for Medical Education in Europe) Conference

August 27-31, 2016,

Barcelona, Spain. 

 

International

The Royal College's International Conference on Residency Education (ICRE)

September 29-October 1, 2016

Niagara Falls, Canada

 

National

Event Calendar

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Medical Education Blog

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Medical Education Grand Rounds

These sessions are typically the last Thursday of the month from 2-3 PM in room HLTH B525.  Meetings involve either a discussion around an article of interest or a presentation of current research followed by discussion.  While the focus is medical education, these sessions are open to all & the topics are usually applicable to other areas of health science education, &, in fact, education in general.  Information on upcoming sessions can be found below.  For more information, to present your research, or to propose an article for discussion for an upcoming meeting.

Check the Event Calendar for upcoming dates and topics.

March, 2016
Enhancing Student Engagement in Large Classes using Team-created Digital Posters

February, 2016
Impact of Distraction & Multitasking

December, 2014
Why I’m Asking You Not to Use Laptops, Anne Curzan.

November, 2014
Am I right when I am sure? Data consistency influences the relationship between diagnostic accuracy and certainty, Cavalcanti & Sibbald.

October, 2014
Can Coaching Help Transform Teacher Quality?, Alex Quigley.

September, 2014
On Dialogue, Culture, and Organizational Learning, Edgar H. Schein.

June, 2014
Medical Student Mental Health 3.0: Improving Student Wellness Through Curricular Changes, Stuart J. Slavin, MD, MEd, Debra L. Schindler, PhD, and John T. Chibnall, PhD 

May 2014
What is the educational impact of standards-based assessment in a medical degree?, Wilkinson, Wells, & Bushnell.

February 2014
Chapter 7: How Do Students Become Self-Directed Learners? in How Learning Works.  7 Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching.

January 2014
Development and evaluation of a risk communication curriculum for medical students.  Risk communication is an important advanced communication skill, and the Risk Talk curriculum provides a model educational intervention and new assessment tools to guide future efforts to teach and evaluate this skill.

December 2013
Do Learners Really Know Best? Urban Legends in Education, Paul A. Kirschner & Jeroen J.G. van Merriënboer

November 2013
Effects of Lecture Information Density on Medical Student Achievement, IJ Russell, WD Hendrickson, & RJ Herbert.

October 2013
From Flexner to Competencies: Reflections on a decade and the journey ahead, Carol L. Carraccio & Robert Englander. The authors reflect on the major forces that have influenced the movement and tipped the balance toward widespread adoption of CBME in the United States, primarily in graduate medical education. These forces include regulatory bodies, international counterparts, and the general public.

September 2013
Self-Directed Learning: A Cognitive and Computational Perspective, Todd M. Gureckis and Douglas B. Markant.

June 2013
Can coaching help transform teacher quality? (Blog)

February 2013
Student perceptions of evaluation in undergraduate medical education: A qualitative study from one medical school, Schiekirka et al., 2012.

January 2013
Effects of Three Types of Lecture Notes on Medical Student Achievement, I.J. Russell et al. (1983)

December 2012
The Readiness for Clerkship Survey: Can self-assessment data be used to evaluater program effectiveness? Linda N. Peterson, PhD, MEd, Kevin W. Eva, PhD, Shayna A. Rusticus, PhD, and Chris Y. Lovato, PhD

Some many months ago while on sabbatical in Hawaii for the first of the two blocks, I discovered that if we run correlations of grouped self-assessment data with the means of the objective tests/measures instead of getting an rnear zero (which is what we get when correlating individual scores) the correlation is actually high and significant indicating a relationship. We found this with TIPS and other data. This was a break-through in the debate over the use and validity of self-assessments. As I was working with Krista to amass some studies to publish (we are hoping that it will come out this year) I confided in one of the authors of the Petersen et al paper, someone with whom I published an article on this topic previously. Then, before I could get my paper out, the Petersen et al paper appeared! Is that an issue? Has there been an ethical breach in this case? What if anything ought one to do about this?

November, 2012
Medical students' approaches to learning over a full degree programme.  This article discusses a study of student approaches to learning and studying - deep, surface, and strategic - in a new medical curriculum in the UK.  Changes in approaches are addressed as well as reasons for the limited amount of change noted.  A significant philosophical question is "how much impact can a medical school curriculum have on the nature of student learning and studying"? 

October, 2012
Physician perceptions of the role and value of basic science knowledge in daily clinical practice

September, 2012
An Innovative way of conducting a journal club.

August, 2012
Randomized controlled trials and meta-analysisin medical education: What role do they play?, David A. Cook.

July, 2012
An Innovative Process for Faculty Development in Residency Training

June, 2012
Collaborative group work: Effects of group size and assignment structure on learning gain, student satisfaction and perceived participation, Jan G.M. Kooloos, Tim Klaassen, Mayke Vereijken, Sascha Van Kuppeveld,Sanneke Bolhuis & Marc Vorstenbosch.

May, 2012
Applying the science of learning to medical education, Richard E. Mayer. The cognitive theory of multimedia learning is an information processing explanation of how people learn from words and pictures. It is based on the idea that people have separate channels for processing words and pictures, that the capacity to process information in working memory is limited, and that meaningful learning requires appropriate cognitive processing during learning.

April, 2012
Faculty Development for Postgraduate Education– The Road Ahead

February, 2012
It’s NOT rocket science: rethinking our metaphors forresearch in health professions education, Glenn Regehr.  This article discusses the divide between applied and theory-building research in health professions education. The author argues that the tenets used in scientific research may not be appropriate for applied research. Instead of focusing on the imperative of proof, educational research should strive for an imperative of understanding. As well, an imperative of complexity should replace the imperative of simplicity strived for in scientific literature. The author concludes that applying more appropriate models to educational research will allow us to achieve greater understanding in this area. 

January, 2012
Applying multimedia design principles enhances learning in medical education, Issa N, Schuller M, Santacaterina S, Shapiro M, Wang E, Mayer RE, DaRosa DA. 

December, 2011
Teacher-student relationships in medical education: Boundary considerations, S. Michael Plaut & Dennis Baker. Personal and situational risk factors may make teachers or students more prone to cross healthy boundaries. Education about boundary issues, including discussion of case vignettes, may help build awareness and thus help foster more balanced teacher–student relationships.

November, 2011
The Lecture System in Teaching Science, Robert T. Morrison, New York University.  This is one instructor's reflections on why he doesn't believe in the lecture system. 
July, 2011 
The replacement of 'paper' cases by interactive online virtual patients in problem-based learning, Terry Poulton, Emily Conradi, Sheetal Kavia, Jonathan Round, and Sean Hilton.  To counter the limitation that paper cases are linear and do not allow students to explore the consequences of decisions, interactive online virtual patients (VPs) were developed which allowed students to consider options as the cases unfold, and allow studuents to explore the consequences of their actions.  St. George's University of London (SGUL) is now adapting its transitional year between the early campus years and the clinical attachment years.  This will include the integration of all technology-based resources with face-to-face learning and create a more adaptive, personalised, comptency-based style of learning. 

June, 2011
The case for urgent change in higher education: Time for adoption of evidence based teaching and learning, Adrian Lee, University of New South Wales.  An urgency in addressing university teaching led to the identification of five major barriers to the adoption of effective teaching practices in higher education:

  1. Lack of leadership at senior management level such that research is perceived as being significantly more valued than teaching
  2. Institutional reward systems that focus primarily on research productivity when academics present for tenure or promotion
  3. Long established practices, norms and beliefs shaped by the experience of faculty members beginning in graduate school and through their induction, socialisation and ongoing careers as faculty members
  4. Faculty lack knowledge about evidence-based learning methods
  5. Lack of practical and effective mechanisms for professional development of faculty regarding teaching

May, 2011
Racial discrimination & health: Pathways & evidence, Ahmed, A.T., Mohammed, S.A., & Williams, D.R.  This article is an overview of the growing body of research examining the ways in which psychosocial stress generated by subjective experiences of discrimination can affect health.

April, 2011
The Treachery of Images: How René Magritte Informs Medical Education, Wear and Zarconi, 2010.  This article questions the role of competencies-based education and calls for more ‘naked’ teaching unattached to competencies.

March, 2011
How can experience in clinical and community settings contribute to early medical education? A BEME systematic review, Dornan et al., 2006. This is a BEME review of the outcomes of early clinical exposure/experiences in Medical Education.  Although a modestly old document, in light of plans for the College of Medicine to incorporate early clinical experiences into the curriculum in a more formal way, this article will help to inform the doubtful and unaware and support change agents.  

January, 2011
Evaluating pelvic examination training: Does faculty involvement make a difference? A randomized controlled trial, Pradhan et al., 2010.  As medical schools continue to strive to deliver high quality education with diminishing resources, the need to evaluate long-standing teaching techniques becomes imperative. The use of gynecological teaching associates to teach pelvic exam skills to medical students is an example of an education intervention that deserves thorough evaluation. The objective was to evaluate effects of two pelvic examination training methods on OB/GYN clerkship students with respect to costs, students' performance, and perception. The two training methods produced comparable OSCE scores, and students in both groups felt more confident after training and found the training sessions to be valuable. There was a significant cost-savings associated with using GTAs for pelvic exam training.

December, 2010
What has changed in the evidence for early experience? Update of a BEME systematic review, Yardley et al., 2010.  This study reviews evidence published from 2002 to 2008 concerning early experience for healthcare undergraduates.

November, 2010
Helping Doctors and Patients Make Sense of Health Statistics, Gigerenzer et al., 2008.  This article provides "evidence that statistical illiteracy (a) is common to patients, journalists, and physicians; (b) is created by nontransparent framing of information that is sometimes an unintentional result of lack of understanding but can also be a result of intentional efforts to manipulate or persuade people; and (c) can have serious consequences for health".  Because statistical literacy is necessary for citizens to make informed health decisions based on accurately interpreting information, it needs to be an essential component of education for the public as well as those in the medical profession.  

August, 2010 
Enhancing Evaluation in an Undergraduate Medical Education Program, Gibson et al., 2008.  Program evaluation strategy at the University of New South Wales

July, 2010 
The Dreyfus model of clinical problem-solving skills acquisition: a critical perspective, Pena, 2009. The Dreyfus model describes how individuals progress through various levels in their acquisition of skills and subsumes ideas with regard to how individuals learn. Such a model is being accepted almost without debate from physicians to explain theacquisition of clinical skills.

June, 2010 
Placing the Patient at the Core of Teaching, Muir, 2007.  Student focus groups indicated that (1) community-based education showed them real life in a home context; (2) early contact with a patient enabled them to have a better understanding of patient-centred medicine; and (3) meeting a patient early in their training infused reality and continuity to their careers and a clearer understanding of the patient's condition.  This article describes a patient shadowing program for undergrad medical students begun at the University of Dundee in 2005. 

May, 2010 
The shuffling of mathematics problems improves learning, Rohrer, D. & Taylor, K., 2007, discusses the results from two experiments analyzing the effects of blocked (standard format) versus randomly mixed practice, as well as massed (traditional) versus spaced (sessions which are taught over a period of time) instruction, in terms of retention.  The experiments support the theory that exam performance and retention improves with mixed or shuffled practice and spaced instruction/practice.

April, 2010 
Medical Education for a Healthier Population: Reflections on the Flexner Report From a Public Health Perspective, reviews the progress of U.S. and Canadian medical schools in addressing public health-oriented principles in the context of contemporary societal health needs, provides an update on recent efforts to address what has long been perceived as a deficit in medical education (inadequate grounding of medical students in public health), and provides new recommendations on how to create important linkages between medical education and public health.

Faculty Development FAQ's

What is Faculty Development?
At the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, we define it as those activities that assist faculty members in the achievement of their academic roles with an aim to enhance the experience of our learners and support the missions of our faculties

Do I need to register in advance to attend the workshops or grandrounds?
Yes. This will enable us to send you the pre-readings and further information. Also, it will be easier to get your certificate for accreditation purposes.

Is there a cost to attend any of the events?
Typically no cost. There may be costs associated for attending conferences or accredited courses offered by external facilitators.

Can I attend events remotely?
Yes, you can. We can make arrangements for you to participate remotely, if you give us advanced notice.

Will it be possible for Faculty Development facilitators to come to our site?
Certainly. Faculty Development serves faculty located anywhere in the province.

Can you organize training based on our specific needs?
Certainly. We believe in customizing training according to your individual/program/department needs. Contact any one of us to discuss.

Contact

Cathy MacLean
Professor and Director

College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan
Room 316, 1121 College Drive, Saskatoon
Phone:
Fax: 306-966-7920

Email

Kalyani Premkumar
Lead, Masters in Education for Health Profession & Professor

College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan
Health Science E-Wing Room 3226
Phone: 306-966-1409
Fax: 306 9667920

Email

Sean Polreis
Faculty Development Coordinator

College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan
Room 317, 1121 College Drive, Saskatoon
Phone: 306-966-1311
Fax: 306-966-5224

Email

TBD
Faculty Development Coordinator, Regina

Email

Mission, Vision and Values

Mission Statement
To provide training & support for all faculty to attain their fullest potential.

Mission
Our mission is to provide training, and, support all of our faculty to their fullest potential in order to attain the College of Medicine’s educational, research and service goals and to advance the provision of high quality, patient-centered care by enhancing the teaching and learning process across the medical education continuum

Vision
To be the pivotal resource to the College of Medicine faculty for instructional, leadership, organizational and professional development to fulfil their social responsibility in medical education

Values
Positive and passionate in everything we do
Teamwork
Faculty engagement across the province
Provide customized support
Use evidence-based approach
Keep our commitments