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Programs

Graduate programs of study are tailored to meet the needs of individual students. Programs of study will be arranged by mutual agreement of a faculty member, who will act as the supervisor, and the graduate student. Graduate programs supervised by faculty in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences are typically administered through the Reproductive Science and Medicine Theme in Interdisciplinary Studies. All graduate programs in Reproductive Science and Medicine include original research and a thesis. 

Each student in Reproductive Science and Medicine is guided individually by an Advisory Committee, which is responsible for the direction and progress of the student and reports to the College of Graduate Studies and Research. Students, Supervisors and members of Advisory Committees are all responsible for ensuring that the College and program requirements are met. College regulations and other useful information are found in the Graduate Student Handbook available on the University of Saskatchewan website.


Advisory Committee

The Advisory Committee will be assembled and meet within 3 months of the student's arrival in the Reproductive Science and Medicine Program. The committee will be chaired by the Graduate Chair of Reproductive Science and Medicine.

Master of Science Program: The Advisory Committee will be comprised of at least 3 members of the Graduate Faculty, at least 2 of whom shall be members of the Reproductive Science and Medicine faculty.

Doctor of Philosophy Program: The Advisory Committee will be comprised of at least 5 members of the Graduate Faculty, at least 3 of whom shall be members of the Reproductive Science and Medicine faculty.

For all graduate programs, at least 1 member of the Advisory Committee will be from outside Reproductive Science and Medicine. The student's progress will be evaluated annually and the Advisory Committee are expected to meet annually, or more frequently. Students must submit a written progress report at an annual meeting of the Advisory Committee. The Graduate Chair will be responsible for communications regarding the student’s progress to the College of Graduate Studies and Research.

The Advisory Committee may, if necessary, seek disciplinary measures concerning a student. Any recommendation by an Advisory Committee to the College of Graduate Studies and Research may be appealed in person by the individual concerned, according to the regulations of the College of Graduate Studies.


Course Requirements

M.Sc. Programs: The course work portion of the program is expected to be comprised of a minimum of 15 credit units beyond a bachelor's or professional degree.

Ph.D. Programs: The course work portion of the program is expected to be comprised of a minimum of 21 credit units beyond a bachelor's or professional degree which may include, at the discretion of the Advisory Committee, courses taken during successful completion of requirements for the M.Sc. degree. It is expected that all students pursuing the Ph.D. degree will complete, or have completed, an M.Sc. degree.

Students are required to give an annual presentation in the Reproductive Biology Research Group Seminar Series.


Academic Standards

Graduate students in Reproductive Science and Medicine are expected to adhere to the regulations of the College of Graduate Studies. Students should obtain 70% in each course required specifically for their degree, and must obtain a cumulative weighted average of 70% for all their courses. Failure to meet these standards may lead to termination of the student's program.


Master of Science Programs  

Qualifying Examination: No qualifying examination is required for M.Sc. programs. 

Comprehensive Examination: An oral comprehensive examination is required upon completion of the graduate course work. In lieu of an oral examination, the student may elect a written examination, which may take the form of national granting agency proposal (typically Medical Research Council), and an oral defence of the proposal.

Doctor of Philosophy Programs

All Ph.D. students are required by the College of Graduate Studies and Research to take a Qualifying Examination and a Comprehensive Examination. Normally, the qualifying examination is expected to be taken within 1 year of commencement of the graduate program. The comprehensive examination is taken after the successful completion of the graduate course work.

In the case of students who are completing an M.Sc. Degree in Reproductive Science and Medicine, the M.Sc. Thesis Defence may serve as the Qualifying Examination for the Ph.D. Program of Studies, if it is so warranted by the Advisory Committee.

Qualifying Examination: A qualifying examination will be held within 6 months of the student's arrival in the Program. The examination is presided over by the Advisory Committee Chair and will consist of an oral examination covering areas with which the student should already be familiar. A wide range of topics will be covered. The object of the examination is to ensure that the student's standard of knowledge is commensurate with his or her qualifications, to identify the student's strengths and weaknesses, and to give the student a clear indication of the standards required by the Department.

Comprehensive Examination: The format of the comprehensive examination is at the discretion of the Advisory Committee which must satisfy itself that the student has adequate background in the specific area of his or her research. The examination may consist of both oral and written portions. Written examinations will be compiled by the Advisory Committee and will not exceed one day in duration. The object of the comprehens ive examination is to ensure that the student is thoroughly conversant with these disciplines, is familiar with the relevant literature, and can argue logically using the basic principles of the discipline. The examination is presided over by the Advisory Committee Chair and is administered and evaluated by the Advisory Committee. The comprehensive examination is expected to be held within six months of the completion of the student's course work.


Master of Science Degree

A thesis is presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for an M.Sc. degree and should deal with a defined topic in Reproductive Science and Medicine. The thesis should demonstrate the candidate's ability to do independent study and investigation, be written in good literary style, and comply with the specifications for thesis publication in the Graduate Student Handbook. The thesis will be read and approved by the student's Advisory Committee prior to submission for examination.  The adequacy of the thesis will be decided by the Advisory Committee. The student will be required to pass an oral examination on the work done for the thesis and on his or her knowledge of matters directly related to it. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The thesis, based upon original investigation, must demonstrate mature scholarship and critical judgment on the part of the candidate. To be acceptable, it must be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge and warrant publication in whole or in part. In addition, it should comply with the specifications outlined by the College of Graduate Studies and Research. A draft of the thesis in its final form must be submitted to the student's Advisory Committee for acceptance. Only when a draft acceptable to the Advisory Committee has been produced will the candidate be given permission to submit the thesis to the Examination Committee. The Examination Committee consists of the Advisory Committee, an examiner from outside the University and such other persons as the Advisory Committee may select with the approval of the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies and Research. The student will be required to pass an oral defence of the work done for the thesis and related areas of research.

Thesis Defence

The thesis defence will be an oral examination related to the content of the thesis and the research methods used. It will be conducted by the student's Advisory Committee and an external examiner under the chairmanship of a representative of the College of Graduate Studies and Research or his or her designate. The student will be expected to present a public seminar on the results of his or her research immediately before the defence.

Thesis Requirement

Thesis requirements are outlined in the Graduate Calendar and in the Graduate Student Handbook. Students are advised to familiarize themselves with these requirements. The supervisor will guide the student regarding progress, thesis preparation and publication. It is expected that the student's research will result in publishable data. Published papers or papers submitted for publication which follow a common theme will typically be organized in the form of separate chapters of a thesis. The form of the thesis must also fulfill the physical requirements of the College of Graduate Studies and Research. Typically, Introduction and Conclusion sections will be written so that the thesis forms a body of work constituting an integrated whole.


For more information on the courses please visit see the University of Saskatchewan Course Catalogue.

Subjects:

  • Anatomy and Cell Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Computational Science
  • Community Health and Epidemiology
  • Plant Science
  • Mathematics
  • Microbiology and Immunology
  • Physiology
  • Herd Medicine and Theriogenology
  • Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences
  • Veterinary Anatomy
  • Veterinary Microbiology 
  • Veterinary Pathology
  • Veterinary Physiological Sciences

The mission of our department is to serve as a resource for education, clinical training, research and technology transfer in reproductive health for both in-country and international health professionals. Members of our full-time and part-time faculty are involved in global reproductive health activities through collaboration with national and international organizations and agencies.

Our department hosts a number of international visiting professorships annually recent examples being Dr. Olufunso Oyesanya, Senior Lecturer University of Manchester, Manchester, England, Professor Minerah Pourjavad, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran, and Professor Lindsay Edouard, Senior Reproductive Health Adviser, Technical and Policy Division, United Nations Population Fund, New York.

Dr. Femi Olatunbosun is involved in collaborative initiatives regarding the development of reproductive health curricula for medical education in developing countries, while Dr. Roger Pierson heads the Women’s Health Imaging and Research Laboratory that is involved in cutting edge reproductive biology research.

The training opportunities provided are varied and include:

  • educational and research capacity building in reproductive health

  • reproductive health curriculum development

  • assisted reproductive technology

  • contraceptive technology

  • population and family planning

  • adolescent health

  • maternal health

  • reproductive rights

Detailed information regarding opportunities for global reproductive health training can be obtained from:

Ms. Kathy Pierson, Clinical Research Coordinator (306) 844-1173.

Matt Schubert MD, FRCSC - Resident Program Director

Darrien Rattray MD, FRCSC - Associate Resident Program Director - Regina Site

General Information

The program is designed to give residents special education and expertise in obstetrics, gynecology and women's health. Housestaff supervision is by academic faculty representing specialty areas of clinical care and basic scientific research. Community specialists on the clinical faculty, who are committed teachers and preceptors, are involved in training in various aspects of obstetrics and gynecology. The patient population is drawn from the entire province of Saskatchewan, providing a wealth of clinical material and an excellent mix of cases. The program is affiliated with five major hospitals, with sophisticated obstetrical and surgical facilities and state-of-the-art equipment.

The first year involves basic clinical training with rotations in internal medicine, emergency room medicine, neonatology, rural and urban obstetrics and gynecology, and general surgery. The second year of residency training concentrates on core obstetrics and gynecology, while the third year of training introduces the subspecialties of reproductive endocrinology, and urogynecology. Formal weekly academic half-days and seminars cover a variety of subjects. Elective time is provided to encourage senior residents to explore fellowship and/or job opportunities.

Ambulatory obstetrics and gynecology and Resident Student Health Clinic at the University of Saskatchewan (for senior residents) provide all residents the opportunity to interact and treat patients during the length of their residency and simulate the private practice environment.

Research activities are emphasized throughout the program. Clinical or basic science projects are done with the support and assistance of faculty. First through fourth year residents are required to work on their research projects throughout the year and present the results of their research projects, in PGY 4, at the Annual Resident Research Day Symposium.

The curriculum is based on the specialty training requirements by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada for Obstetrics and Gynecology. Successful completion of the residency leads to eligibility for certification (by examination) by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.

Selection of first year resident positions is done via the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS). It is anticipated that residents entering the residency will remain with the program and progress through the five years of training.

Quick Facts 
  • The training program is based in Saskatoon, where the University of Saskatchewan, College of Medicine is located.

  • As of July 1, 2009, 4 residency positions are based as full time annually in Saskatoon and 2 residency positions are based full time annually in Regina; these positions must be applied for separately through CaRMS. For more information, see the Obstetrics & Gynecology - Saskatoon program description and/or Obstetrics & Gynecology - Regina program description.

  • Strong emphasis on distributed learning with rotations scheduled in Regina, Saskatoon and Prince Albert.

  • Strong emphasis on early hands-on labour and delivery, operating room and ward experience in the core obstetrics and gynecology rotations.

  • Attending staff to resident ratio is 2:1; residents have direct 1:1 clinic experience with attending staff in the clinic, case room and operating theatre.

  • Exposure to advanced expertise in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery, reproductive endocrinology and infertility, maternal fetal medicine, urogynecology and gynecologic oncology through rotations in both Saskatoon and Regina.

  • Community obstetrics and gynecology rotation in Prince Albert are a highlight of the curriculum.

  • International and interprovincial electives are supported and encouraged as part of elective time - arranged on an individual basis.

  • Structured and comprehensive academic program, including academic half-day, weekly subspecialty rounds, monthly grand rounds and journal club, most teaching sessions are videoconferenced.

  • Annual resident retreat with residents and faculty to discuss the direction of the program.

  • Web-based evaluation system (One45 WebEval).

  • Twice yearly practice OSCE exams for all residents in preparation for final year Royal College exams.

Distributive Learning at the University of Saskatchewan, The College of Medicine, while physically located in Saskatoon, is a provincial resource in attitude and in practice. Postgraduate medical education at the University of Saskatchewan takes seriously its role in supporting quality health care to all people of the province. This means training physicians to meet the needs of not only urban populations, but also those of rural and remote populations. In so doing, the College of Medicine has developed, and continues to develop, rotations in other communities. These rotations are designed to provide educational experiences to enhance the resident's knowledge and skills, and take maximum advantage of unique educational opportunities in diverse communities. All postgraduate programs are expected to develop and incorporate into their curriculum, rotations in communities other than Saskatoon. The manner in which each program does this is not strictly prescribed by the College of Medicine - but is determined by the Residency Program Committee, taking into consideration the needs of their residents, and the excellent opportunities available in other locations. These rotations continue to evolve as we seek to build stronger and better programs.

Extensive support is available for out of town rotations. The exact nature of this support varies with location and program. The communities involved, individual programs, the College of Medicine,and the Ministry of Health work collaboratively to ensure residents are not financially disadvantaged by the need to relocate.

For residents assigned to short term rotations in Regina and Prince Albert housing is provided. Where necessary, every effort will be made to provide family friendly accommodations.

If you have any questions, please contact: 

Ms. Marj Lens, Resident Program Administrator
Tel: (306) 844-1199
Fax: (306) 844-1526
E-mail: marj.lens@usask.ca

Divisions

The Division of Gynecologic Oncology offers inpatient and outpatient care for women with pre-invasive and invasive diseases of the female genital tract.  Among the division's specialized services are brachytherapy and chemotherapy.  The division members work closely with the Saskatoon Cancer Center and provide consultative services to other gynecologists in the province.

 Information or referral :

(306) 844-1064

 Fax:

(306) 844-1526

 24-hr emergency referral:  

(306) 655-1000

The Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine cares for patients with high risk pregnancies and offers a variety of diagnostic and treatment options, including:

  • biophysical evaluation
  • obstetric ultrasound
  • maternal medical conditioning monitoring
  • diabetes in pregnancy
  • hypertensive disorders of pregnancy
  • prenatal screening
  • prenatal testing
  • intrauterine fetal therapy
 Information or referral: (306) 653-5970
 Fax: (306) 653-5383
 24-hour emergency referral:   (306) 655-1000
 Fetal Assessment Unit: (306) 655-1995

The Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility treats patients with reproductive endocrine problems. The Assisted Reproductive Technology, University of Saskatchewan (ARTUS) center offers advanced reproductive services to infertile couples. Our andrology laboratory offering advanced sperm analysis and one of the largest artificial-insemination programs in Saskatchewan with seven-day-a-week service. The divisions services include:

  • in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryo transfer
  • embryo cryopreservation
  • fallopian tube cannulation
  • diagnostic and operative laparoscopy, including laser surgery
  • tubal reconstructive microsurgery
  • diagnostic and operative hysteroscopy

Current division research studies include investigation of recurrent pregnancy loss, human papilloma virus (HPV) detection in sperm using DNA, the use of insulin sensitizers in polycystic ovary syndrome, and HRT for menopausal symptoms. The division is also extensively involved in nationwide clinical trials sponsored by industry and the Canadian Institute of Health Research. 

Information or referral:  (306) 966-1953
Fax: (306) 966-8040
24-hour emergency referral:    (306) 655-1000
The Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery is a national leader in the field of urodynamic testing and urogynecology surgery. It has conducted one of the largest numbers of laparoscopic Burch procedures. 

Information or referral:     (306) 653-5970

The department's core division offers an extensive array of inpatient and outpatient evaluative and therapeutic programs in all aspects of the specialty. The department is noted especially for being a center of excellence in gynecologic endoscopic surgery.

Our goal focuses mainly on providing excellence in reproductive biology research. Our Women’s Health and Imaging and Research Laboratory (WHIRL) conducts cutting edge research in Assisted Reproduction and Reproductive Endocrinology. Our research also includes molecular endocrinology and molecular biology. We are pioneers in the philosophy of integrating bench and clinical research.

At the Women’s Health Imaging Research Laboratory we combine sophisticated transvaginal ultrasonographic techniques with computer assisted image analysis to study ovarian follicular dynamics. This provides a non-invasive system for evaluating the health of ovarian follicles in Assisted Reproductive Technology.

 Information:   (306) 966-2212
 Fax: (306) 966-8040

Research

Multiple Courses of Antenatal Corticosteroids for Preterm Birth Study (MACS)

Site Investigator: Femi Olatunbosun, MD 

In Canada today, approximately 7% of infants are born preterm. About half of these infants are exposed to multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids. A multicentre randomised controlled trial is under way to determine the effectiveness of this important antenatal treatment. The Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at Royal University Hospital is one of many participating centres in the study. The Principal Investigator is Kellie Murphy, MD at the University of Toronto.

Primary Research Question:

For women 25-32 weeks gestational age, fourteen or more days following a single course of antenatal corticosteroids (ACS), who remain at increased risk of preterm birth, compared to placebo are multiple courses of ACS every 14 days, until 33 weeks, effective in reducing the risk of perinatal or neonatal mortality or significant neonatal morbidity?

Background:

For women at increased risk of preterm birth, the benefits of a single course of ACS are well established. These include a reduction in neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and neonatal mortality. These benefits have been demonstrated to begin 24 hours post treatment and continue up to 7 days. Extrapolating these benefits, many physicians have suggested that weekly courses be given to women who remain at increased risk of preterm birth. In some centres, the practice of giving multiple courses of ACS has become routine. Although animal studies have found that multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids may result in decreased infant growth in the uterus, recently completed well-designed human studies have not found any effect of multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids on the growth of the infant. These recent human studies have also suggested that multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids may have some benefits for the infant but the studies were too small to know if the benefits are real. We therefore need a study like this one to clarify whether multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids are truly beneficial.

For more information about this research study, please contact the site Principal Investigator, Dr. Femi Olatunbosun, at (306) 844-1056. You may also visit the MACS website at http://www.utoronto.ca/miru/macs/.

Multiple Courses of Antenatal Corticosteroids for Preterm Birth Study - 5 Year Follow-Up (MACS-5)

Site Investigator: Femi Olatunbosun, MD

MACS-5 will follow children whose mother's were enrolled in MACS until they are 5 years old.  MACS-5 will study the long-term benefits and safety of giving multiple courses of antenatal corticosteroids to women at risk of preterm delivery. 

For more information about this research study, please contact the site Principal Investigator, Dr. Femi Olatunbosun, at (306) 844-1056.

You may also visit the MACS-5 website.

Principal Investigator: Allison Case, MD

Clomiphene citrate is commonly used in combination with timed intrauterine insemination as a treatment for unexplained infertility. It is given usually for five consecutive days, starting on either day 3 or day 5 of the menstrual cycle. The decision to start on day 3 or day 5 is usually determined by the patients cycle length, and by the physician’s past experience and preference.

Clomiphene citrate works as an "anti-estrogen" or estrogen blocker. When it binds to estrogen receptors in the brain, it "fools" the brain into thinking that there is insufficient estrogen production, which results in an increase in the secretion of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) from the brain. FSH is the hormone that is normally secreted to stimulate the growth of an egg in the ovary each month. In about 1 in 5 women, clomiphene citrate can have an anti-estrogenic action on other organs, particularly the uterus. This is identified by seeing a thin endometrial lining on ultrasound. A thin endometrial lining may impair the ability of an embryo to implant in the uterus, which may consequently reduce the chances of becoming pregnant.

The main objective of this study is to determine if starting clomiphene citrate on day 3 versus day 5 of the menstrual cycle will influence the anti-estrogenic effects on the uterine lining. We will also determine if there is a difference in follicle growth and pregnancy rates. This information may have an impact on the management of some couples with infertility.

Site Principal Investigator: Femi Olatunbosun, MD FRCSC

About 2-3% of all pregnant women are expecting twins.  Twins are at slightly higher risk of problems around the time of labour and birth as compared to single babies. When a twin pregnancy is at term and the first twin is in the head down position, a decision needs to be made as to whether the babies would be best delivered by planning a vaginal birth, or whether a Caesarean section should be undertaken.

Although problems may occur during any labour or vaginal birth, there is some evidence that twin pregnancies near term, have higher rates of complications than pregnancies with only one baby.

These complications might arise because of problems during pregnancy or during birth. Both twins may be at risk but birth complications more often happen for the second twin after the delivery of the first twin. Still, many doctors believe that women giving birth to twins when the first twin is coming head first, may safely give birth vaginally, with only a very low risk of serious problems (less than 5 in 1000 having a significant problem at the time of the birth).  As you know, there is a small risk of problems in any labour or birth.

There is medical evidence that the risks to the second twin may be less if the babies are delivered by planned Caesarean section. This alternative does not guarantee that the babies will be delivered without difficulty however, and may result in unnecessary problems for the mother.

There has been only one study, which has compared planned Caesarean section with planned vaginal birth for the delivery of twins. This study was too small to answer the question of the better approach for delivery. At the present time, there is no reliable evidence to justify either routine Caesarean section or routine vaginal delivery.

Because of these uncertainties, physicians in Canada and other countries are taking part in a large study, the Twin Birth Study, to find out which is the better method of delivery for the twin babies (where the first twin is positioned head down). The study will also find out which is the better approach for delivery for the mother.

For more information about this research study, please contact the Site Principal Investigator, Dr. Femi Olatunbosun, at (306) 844-1056 or the Clinical Research Coordinator, Kathleen Pierson, at (306) 844-1173.

 

Investigators: Donna R. Chizen MD, Marla E. Lujan PhD, Roger A. Pierson PhD  

We are working to promote the early diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by improving the identification of polycystic ovaries on ultrasound. PCOS is the most common cause of infertility in women. Typical symptoms and signs include irregular periods, extra facial/body hair growth, weight problems and polycystic ovaries on ultrasound. The current ultrasound definition of the polycystic ovary does not allow physicians to appropriately distinguish between women with or without PCOS.  By comparing the ovaries of women with or without PCOS, we will accurately redefine the ultrasound criteria of the polycystic ovary and greatly improve the diagnosis, treatment and the long-term health of women with PCOS. By participating in this study, both women with or without PCOS will gain valuable information about their current health and fertility.

Contact Info:  Office of Dr. Donna Chizen at 306-844-1063.

Site Principal Investigator: Femi Olatunbosun, MD FRCSC 

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the misoprostol vaginal insert (MVI) compared to Cervidil.  Cervidil is a vaginal insert that has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in softening the cervix (mouth of the womb) to help induce labor.  Misoprostol is currently available in tablet form for the treatment of stomach ulcers, but has not been approved by the FDA for use in softening the cervix to help induce labor.  There is reason to believe that misoprostol could also be used to soften the cervix and help induce labor; therefore, the misoprostol vaginal insert (MVI) has been developed.  The MVI (study drug) is investigational which means it has not been approved by the FDA.  The study drug is designed to have two actions.  The first is to soften your cervix so that your baby can be born.  The study drug may also cause contractions (cramps) to start which will push your baby out of your uterus (womb). 

For more information about this research study, please contact the site Principal Investigator, Dr. Femi Olatunbosun, at (306) 844-1056. 

 

Investigators: 1Angela Baerwald PhD CCRP RDMS, 1Allison Case MD FRCSC and 2Margo Fluker MD FRCSC

Funding Agency: Royal University Hospital Foundation

Study Locations:

1. Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences

Royal University Hospital

College of Medicine

University of Saskatchewan

103 Hospital Drive

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Canada

S7N 0W8

2. Genesis Fertility Centre

Suite 550 - 555 West 12th Avenue

Vancouver, British Columbia

V5Z 3X7

Study Objective: To evaluate the effect of synchronizing initiation of ovarian stimulation treatment with follicular wave emergence in women undergoing IVF/ICSI and ET that have had a poor response to stimulation in the past.

Partial drug coverage is provided.

For more information, please contact Dr. Angela Baerwald at 844-1193
 

Investigators: Angela Baerwald PhD CCRP RDMS and Allison Case MD FRCSC

Funding Agency: Organon Canada Ltd.

Study Objective: To compare vaginal versus oral methods of suppressing ovarian follicle development with contraceptives prior to beginning stimulation therapy in women undergoing IVF/ ICSI and ET.

For more information, please contact Dr. Angela Baerwald at 844-1193.

Investigators: Angela Baerwald PhD CCRP RDMS and Donna Chizen MD FRCSC RDMS

Funding Agency: Canadian Foundation for Women’s Health

Study Objectives: The primary objective is to determine whether dynamics of ovarian follicular waves are repeatable over multiple menstrual cycles.  The secondary objective is to determine the effect of age on ovarian follicular wave dynamics.  

For more information, please contact Dr. Angela Baerwald at 844-1193 or Dr. Donna Chizen at 844-1063.

Publications

Peer-Reviewed Publications:

Robertson DM, Kumar A, Kalra B, Shah S, Pruysers E, Vanden Brink H, Chizen D, Visser JA,Themmen AP, Baerwald A. 2014. Detection of Serum Antimüllerian Hormone in Women approaching Menopause using Sensitive Antimüllerian Hormone Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assays. Menopause. 21(12): 1277-86.

Basnayaka U, Chapman D, Adams G, Wysokinski T, Belev G, and Baerwald A. 2014. Diffraction Enhanced Synchrotron Imaging of Bovine Ovaries Ex Vivo. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences: in press.

Pierson, R.A., O.A. Olatunbosun, D.R. Chizen, H. Saunders, E. Loumaye and B. DeMoustier. 2014. Recombinant Human Luteinizing Hormone to Trigger Ovulation: A Prospective, Randomized, Phase II Dose-Finding Study. Journal of Reproductive Medicine 59(7-8):355-366. 

Williamson, L.E.A., K.L. Lawson, P.J. Downe and R.A. Pierson. 2014. Informed Reproductive Decision-Making: The Impact of Providing Fertility Information on Fertility Knowledge and Intentions to Delay Childbearing. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(5):400-405.

Clark, N.M., A.J. Podolski, E.D. Brooks, D.R. Chizen, R.A. Pierson, D.C. Lehotay and M.E. Lujan. Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Phenotypes Using Updated Criteria for Polycystic Ovarian Morphology: An Assessment of Over 100 Consecutive Women Self-reporting Features of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Reproductive Sciences 21(8):1034-1043.

Yapura, M.J., R.J. Mapletoft, R.A. Pierson, J. Singh and G.P. Adams. 2014. Effects of Vehicle and Route of Administration of Letrozole on Ovarian Function in a Bovine Model. Reproduction, Fertility and Development 26:1198-1205. 

Stenekes SJ, Ens CD, Harlos, M; Chochinov HM, Mytopher K.  A descriptive study evaluating perinatal healthcare providers’ prerspectives of palliative programming in 3 canadian institutions.  J of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing.  2014:10:1097

Thiel J, Briggs M, Pohlman S, Rattray D.  Evaluation of the Novasure endometrial ablation procedure in women with uterine cavity length over 10 cm.  J Obstet Gynaecol Canada 2014;36:491-497.

Thiel J, Rattray D, Cher D.  Pre-hysterectomy assessment of immendiate tubal occlusion with the third generation ESSURE insert (ESS505).  J Minim Invasive Gynecol 2014, May 23 (Epub ahead of print)

Thiel JA, Rattray D, Cher DJ. Pre-hysterectomy assessment of immediate tubal occlusion with the third generation ESSURE insert (ESS505). Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology.

Pfiefer, L.F.M., G.P. Adams, R.A. Pierson and J. Singh. 2014. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy: A Non-Invasive Approach for In Vivo Evaluation of Oocytes and Small Antral Follicles in Mammals. Reproduction, Fertility and Development. 26(1): 48-54.

Hughes, E. and R.A. Pierson. 2014. Art and Medicine: Hand and Glove. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(12):1136.

Pierson, R.A. and E. Hughes. 2014. Medieval Caesarean Section. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(11):1040.

Pierson, R.A. and E. Hughes. 2014. Placenta Bowl. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(10):944.

Hughes, E. and R.A. Pierson. 2014. Mother and Child: A Quiet Mystery. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(9):848.

Hughes, E. and R.A. Pierson. 2014. From Cradle to Grave. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(8):752.

Pierson, R.A. and E. Hughes. 2014. Moche Pot. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(7):656.

Hughes, E. and R.A. Pierson. 2014. William Smellie and the Macabre Side of Obstetrical Science. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(6):560.

Pierson, R.A. and E. Hughes. 2014. Primitive Passion. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(5):464.

Hughes, E. and R.A. Pierson. 2014. Pregnant Woman. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(4):368.

Pierson, R.A. and E. Hughes. 2014. The Birth of Cupid. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(3):280.

Hughes, E. and R.A. Pierson. 2014. Love Conquers All. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(2):192.

Pierson, R.A. and E. Hughes. 2014. A New Year – An Old Hope.  Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Canada 36(1):96.

Mothahshami F, Thiele A, Karreman E, Thiel J. Comparing technical dexterity of sleep-deprived versus intoxicated surgeons. Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons.  Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons. 18:epub ahead of print.

Thiel J, Rattray D, Leyland N. Laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA of symptomatic fiborids and myomectomy: a randomized trial of uterine-sparing techniques in Canada. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology 21:S101.

Laberge P, Garza-Leal J, Fortin C, Basinski C, Thiel J, Leyland N, Presthus J, Johns A, Grainger D, Adkins T, Swarup M. A prospective, randomized, multi-center, controlled international clinical study of the safety and efficacy of the MINERVA endometrial ablation system. 6 and 12 months follow-up results.  Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. 21:S144.

Thiel J, Fortin C, Sanders B, Rattray D, Weins L. Emerging results from the Crystal trial: a feasibility study of the Channel Medsystems Device for Endometrial cyroablation (DEC). Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. 21:S147.

Thiel J, Rattray D. A randomized trial of uterine-sparing fibroid treatments in Canada: laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA) and myomectomy.  Gynecological Surgery 11:184-185.

Thiel J, Rattray D, Fortin C, Sanders B. An evaluation of uterine healing following cryoablation. Gynecological Surgery 11:348-349.

BOOKS, CHAPTERS IN BOOKS, EXPOSITORY AND REVIEW ARTICLES:

Olatunbosun OA 2014. Research methods in sexual and reproductive health. In Confronting the challenges of reproductive health in Africa: A textbook for students and development practitioners. . F. Okonofua, Editor. Brown Walker Press, Boca Raton, Florida USA 2014 pp. 21-39.

Edouard E, OA Olatunbosun 2014.The control of sexually transmitted infections through integrated health programs. In Confronting the challenges of reproductive health in Africa: A textbook for students and development practitioners. . F. Okonofua, Editor. Brown Walker Press, Boca Raton, Florida. USA 2014 pp. 237-259

Contact

Lorraine Bishop

Tel: (306) 844-1059